N Scale Build of the Delaware, Susquehanna & Northern Railroad

Hardcoaler Dec 20, 2021

  1. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    Polyfiber seems to be the main ingredient for the forest canopy method you describe and polyfiber is used for "puffball" trees too. Separate trees are placed in front and the polyfiber or puffball cover is then blended in to cover the rest toward the rear. My layout is only 36" deep, so whatever I use, it needs to be able to withstand some scrutiny. Or, I change prototypes, model southern AZ, make a few saguaros with pipe cleaners and be done with it. :)
     
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  2. in2tech

    in2tech TrainBoard Member

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    Let's... I came up with 486,942 and a half. One struck by lighting :) Sorry, I'll stop now!
     
  3. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    I'll go with your number as being accurate @in2tech . As a result, our Board is considering a reincorporation as the Delaware, Susquehanna & Tucson. Yep, $12.99 and ten minutes, and I'm done with scenery. :ROFLMAO:

    upload_2023-6-5_19-21-55.png
     
  4. BNSF FAN

    BNSF FAN TrainBoard Supporter

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    Cactus for the win!!!! :cool: You should give in2tech some extra credit for spotting that 1/2 tree. :D

    The bridge abutments and piers all turned out great! Really like how the layout is coming together (y)(y)(y)
     
  5. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    Thank you. I'm looking too at how I might do rocks. I'm thinking about Rubber Rocks from https://www.cripplebush.net. Thickness matters in my trackside locations, but he has a product that will fit I think. I didn't have much luck with rock plaster molds on my previous layout, but did okay carving my own. So, more research to do with all of that.
     
  6. freddy_fo

    freddy_fo TrainBoard Member

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    If you are ok with sculpting in place the woodland scenics mold-a-scene plaster (C1202) is my go to along with a set of cheap dental tools and a hobby knife. A small amount to start so as to practice without wasting a large batch that sets before you can get to it. I like it over the other plasters because it contains little grains of what I believe to be mica which as you are sculpting will break loose the surface granules giving a more realistic texture.

     
  7. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    That's interesting. The anthracite region has shale rock, so my carving would be different than his, but as you wrote, with some practice, I could succeed with it. Whatever course is chosen, I'll have about six linear feet of rock wall to install or carve. Both would require painting/staining.

    upload_2023-6-6_12-34-45.png
     
  8. BigJake

    BigJake TrainBoard Member

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    Awesome video! The small batches are also easier to tear out and redo if it doesn't work out like you wanted the first (or fourth) time!

    As he was progressing, I noticed the wonderful talus building up at the base of the rocks, but then he vacuumed it up! (n) I might leave it (or at least some of it), since it is already shaped in random flakes that would have naturally weathered and cleaved away from such rocks, as well as the debris from when such a hillside was cut away to begin with. Notice these cubic rocks are the kind that tend to flake off their faces as water penetrates, freezes and thaws, revealing a new flat(ish) face behind it (and repeats over and over).

    Thanks for posting, and listing your material and tool preferences, too!
     
  9. freddy_fo

    freddy_fo TrainBoard Member

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    That c1202 will give you better results I think. It sets soft really quick so you can do the basic molding then within 5 or so minutes start making your heavy passes with a #11 hobby knife blade where you want your deep crevices. After the basic sculpting start making lighter horizontal and vertical passes (probably more horizontal for what you are trying to do) with that same blade to blend the rock face so the deep cuts look more natural. You'll get a feel as the mixture sets as to how much you can push things. A small wire brush like a tooth brush you can find at the auto parts store also will help as the mixture hardens to knock off little bits of the surface mica for that rough shale finish.
     
  10. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    Hmm, I just noticed that I'd have to reach between 23" and 33" to carve 39-1/2" of rock around the perimeter of a long curve. Considering the time it would take to do it well, my arm would get mighty tired, even in short lengths. If I stand behind the layout to get closer, I can't see the surface I'd be carving. Sigh. I may be back to the Rubber Rocks option ......
     
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  11. Sumner

    Sumner TrainBoard Member

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    Sorry posted in the wrong place,

    Sumner
     
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  12. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    I've been having some setbacks painting my rubber rocks, but am finally making some progress. It's a great product; I lack artistic skills. When I get this section glued in place, I'll work the other two. Then will come some plaster to smooth the rock's transition to the foam that will surround it. I really like the Kato ballast (24-039), just the perfect thing to lessen the toy train track look.

    2023-09-05 Muleshoe Curve Rubber Rock.jpg
     
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  13. HemiAdda2d

    HemiAdda2d Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Nice rock strata!
     
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  14. country joe

    country joe TrainBoard Member

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    The rock work looks great to my eyes.
     
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  15. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    Always with an eye toward economy, the DS&N RR developed an inexpensive landscape material recovery tool using mesh material on the end of a vacuum crevice tool. After spreading glue and sifting scenic materials on it, there always remains a lot of material that is loose after the glue dries. A quick vacuuming with this rig picks it up and when I shut off the vacuum, it falls away.

    2023-11-08 Vacuum Grass Catcher.jpg

    2023-11-08 002 Vacuum Grass Catcher.jpg
     
  16. Doug Gosha

    Doug Gosha TrainBoard Member

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    Frugality is a virtue!

    :D

    Doug
     
  17. BNSF FAN

    BNSF FAN TrainBoard Supporter

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    Great idea to recoup the extra material. The progress is looking good sir! (y)(y)(y)
     
  18. Bruce Archer

    Bruce Archer TrainBoard Member

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    I am sending a PM to you

    Bruce
     
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  19. in2tech

    in2tech TrainBoard Member

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    Ready to reveal where you actually spread it, or is it a secret for now :)
     
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  20. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    :LOL: That's a good point! My scenery isn't very inspiring, so I've taken very few photos of it and my progress has been very slow. With my layout having removable scenic sections in case we move someday, it's taking forever to work through it and now I'm tempted to redo some of what's been completed. Arrrgh.
     

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