Courtesy While Visiting A Layout

BarstowRick Oct 2, 2009

  1. jhn_plsn

    jhn_plsn TrainBoard Supporter

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    Well said. Especially the shower issue. I have been to layout tours where guys are wearing tank-tops or muscle shirts. I don't think most of us intended to have aroma therapy like that to show how hard their railroad works. I will admit I have been caught in a muscle shirt from time to time and I kick myself in the butt for doing it around large groups.
    Your reference of the general inaccurate impression is difficult to overcome in many circles so this is something to always keep in mind.
     
  2. TWhite

    TWhite TrainBoard Member

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    I'm a 'newbie' to the forum, so I haven't had a chance to answer to this post yet. But my 'California Basement' (garage) layout is pretty visible from the street when I have the door up and am working on it.

    Though I'm a "Lone Wolf" and have never really opened up the MR for a 'tour', in the eight or so years I've been building it, I've had a lot of people walking by on the street stop in and ask about it. And that's everything from kids to adults. For the most part, I've found them to be really kind of polite and fascinated by what I'm doing, and I always take time out from working on the layout to answer questions.

    Oddly enough, I've never had kids try and 'touch' things, they all seem to stand back respectfully and just look at the layout. Of course, I always get the "Can you run a train?" question, and generally I will for them. And with a lot of kids, I get the old "Can it run FASTER?" question which cracks me up, because my MR is a mountain layout with lots of (generous) curves and a couple of sections of almost-ceiling to concrete floor drops. I patiently explain that I try to keep the trains at a relatively slow speed as they're trying to conquer some relatively stiff grades. That seems to satisfy them.

    I've only had one incident where I felt I had to actually DEFEND my model railroad, and that was from a father and son walking by who stopped in to see it. While the son--about ten or so--was respectfully examining the layout, the father decided to become an expert on what I was doing wrong with the scenery. This kind of tree didn't grow at that elevation, stuff like that. I politely told him that the area I was modeling was the area that I had been born and raised in and was intimately familiar with. It was then that I realized that he was putting on a 'show' for his son. I had a feeling that when they left, Daddy looked at his son and said, "The guy doesn't know what he's doing." Oh, well---

    But for the most part, the people that occasionally drop by when I'm out working on the layout are very nice. I've never actually 'opened' the layout to fellow model railroaders--not because I'm nervous about it, but because being a 'Lone Wolf', I really don't know that many.

    Another poster on another MR website suggested I open it for the NMRA convention coming to Sacramento in two years, however, I'm not an NMRA member, so I don't think that would work.

    I don't think I'd be embarrassed to show the layout to a fellow modeler at all, but the only thing that would worry me is "What the Heck do I do about all the JUNK under the layout?" LOL!

    Tom
     
  3. jhn_plsn

    jhn_plsn TrainBoard Supporter

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    Tom, welcome to Trainboard. Maybe new here but I think many here already know that you are quite an accomplished modeler. You will be a great addition here.
     
  4. TWhite

    TWhite TrainBoard Member

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    John:

    Thank you. I'm really glad to see a lot of old friends from the 'other' website. I think I'll like it here a lot.

    Thanks again.
    Tom
     
  5. craz3474

    craz3474 TrainBoard Member

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    This is a post from another site but might be of interest to everyone. Thanks to Rob from ZTrack Magazine for providing this info.

    "In the July/August issue of Ztrack, you will find an insert for American Collectors Insurance. Though we typically do not comment on our advertisers, this time we feel it is very important to point this insert out. As well look at our collections, you will realize that you have quite an investment in trains. This should not be dismissed. Many home owners policies will not cover the full loss of your collection. Additional insurance is the only way to really protect your investment.

    I would like to point out a couple if items highlighted in the brochure. One is that you can have $10,000 coverage for $75.00. This is a good value, It does cover flood, earthquake and accidental breakage. This is a big one... drop your AZL AC12? You are covered! This is just amazing to me.

    If you would like to read up more about protecting your collection and tips to protect the value and maintaining your collection. I encourage you to pick up a copy of the November/December 2003 issue of Ztrack. The focus of this issue is insuring you collection. Back issues are still available. "
    Ztrack: 2003 Back Issues
    Collectibles Insurance Program | American Collectors Insurance
     
  6. Colonel

    Colonel Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Tom welcome to Trainboard I hope you get a great deal of enjoyment here.

    I have never had an open house however I have had a number of modellers visit the layout. Personally if i know someone is coming to visit I ensure i operate all the rollingstock first to ensure the layout is reliable. Nothing frustrates me more if i have visitors and the layout has a problem or a train is constantly uncoupling etc.

    If a friend brings a train to operate that's fine as well however there equipment usually needs fine tuning to my poor track laying I think every layout has its own idiosyncrasy.
     

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