Woodland Scenics plaster issue

bigGG1fan Nov 3, 2020

  1. bigGG1fan

    bigGG1fan TrainBoard Member

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    Sanded the plaster on the risers, but disappointed the overall result is bumpy (step-like) where the plaster overlaps. Wondering if we should spackle to even out the track surface?

    Any advice for a noob?

    Thanks!

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  2. Calzephyr

    Calzephyr TrainBoard Supporter

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    Normally the process WS employs is the use of their brand of plaster clothe. You don't have to buy their brand... I get mine from Dick Blicks. Essentially the same for much le$$.

    After the risers are covered, you can sand that some and use a thin layer of spackle if needed.
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  3. John Moore

    John Moore TrainBoard Supporter

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    I just use regular plaster for filling in the uneven spots and gaps. Laid over that is the plaster cloth. I use a thin wash of plaster to get rid of uneven spots. I lay my cut to size plaster cloth where I want it and use a spray bottle to wet it then my finger to work it to where it is needed.
     
  4. Calzephyr

    Calzephyr TrainBoard Supporter

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    One of the problems with the WS incline and risers is the abrupt change from flat to incline. The change has to be moderated by sanding the foam to transition better. I would not try to do the transition using plaster or plaster clothe.

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  5. PAPPY1

    PAPPY1 TrainBoard Member

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    I am not sure what you mean about abrupt change using the WS incline and risers. I have used both and do not have any problems.
     
  6. BigJake

    BigJake TrainBoard Member

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    The change in slope between flat and incline risers is abrupt, not the height.

    Same thing happens at the bottom end of the incline.
     
  7. Calzephyr

    Calzephyr TrainBoard Supporter

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    Hi Pappy,
    It is not very noticable to the naked eye but going from a 'zero' incline to a 2% or 4% incline set can be a problem in N scale.

    When lying track with built-in roadbed (like Unitrak) the track will not lay flat unless it is glued and pressed down with heavy weights.

    There are some 'fixes' before plaster clothe is added by sanding the incline to transition to a lower gradient where they join on the upward incline.

    On the downward incline some filling with slivers of cardboard with spackle can lessen the incline grade mismatch.

    Hope that helps

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  8. Inkaneer

    Inkaneer TrainBoard Member

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    To lessen the change from a flat surface to an incline you need a vertical easement to gradually increase or decrease the incline. This takes some space and in this world of 9 3/4" curves and how much track can I fit on a layout that is 2 X 4 feet, that space can be non existent.
     
  9. BigJake

    BigJake TrainBoard Member

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    Theoretically, the piece you sliced off to make the easement at the top of the grade, can be flipped over and used to fill and create the easement at the bottom of the grade.

    In theory, practice & theory are equivalent.
    In practice, they are not.
     
  10. Trains

    Trains TrainBoard Member

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    You can get plaster cloth at Hobby Lobby with a 40% off coupon from their web site or news paper.
     
  11. Inkaneer

    Inkaneer TrainBoard Member

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    That is so profound.
     
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  12. BigJake

    BigJake TrainBoard Member

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    Yes, but it is not original to me; I just read it somewhere.

    I have applied and/or been reminded of it many times.

    Usually, it was not so much as the theory was incorrect, but that the theory was not completely understood and followed.
     
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