Winter In New England

mikelhh Apr 3, 2013

  1. mikelhh

    mikelhh TrainBoard Member

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    OK well in response to requests for more H0 layout threads, here's a brief look at mine.

    This is my 2nd winter layout. The first was abandoned because of poor baseboards. This one is on hollow core doors in an L shape, 14 x 9 ft. Track is nearly all code 100, which I salvaged from the old layout.

    I chose the wintry landscape because I like the mood it creates, and I felt it was appropriate for the early days of Guilford's takeover of the MEC, B & M and D & H. Also, in those early-mid eighties, a lot of those railroads' locos in original colours were integrated with Guilford greys, giving quite a colourful mix.
    That all led to an interest in the above-mentioned fallen flags, and so the loco fleet grew, even though my primary interest was Guilford itself. What it all means is that I run what I want, and while I make an effort to match locos and rollingstock - and road vehicles - I don't obsess about it.

    I decided I wanted some trackage that was at least based on something prototypical, and after much research I decided I liked the look of the now long gone Calais yard, formerly operated by the MEC. In my world the yard was never closed down by Guilford. I've been able to go close to replicating the track plan, albeit with much shortening and a minor adjustment or two.

    It's the Maine Central's turn in this shot...

    [​IMG]



     
  2. mikelhh

    mikelhh TrainBoard Member

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    Behind the end backscene there is a drop-down extension, as long as the layout is high [42ins] attached by a piano hinge. It adds significantly to the operating interest.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 3, 2013
  3. mikelhh

    mikelhh TrainBoard Member

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    From the yard a single mainline proceeds over a short bridge/causeway that spans a tidal inlet.

    [​IMG]

    I remember using a roll of masking tape as a steam roller to compact the rocks. It did a great job. Water is two part epoxy resin.

    Just beyond the short bridge the line splits into two, the rearmost line leading off to my depiction of the rickety and neglected spur [former B&M trackage] that once served the Newlywed Bakery at Watertown. In its last days of use, Guilford locos suffered derailments there.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Somewhere on this forum I posted about the construction of this line, but I can't seem to find it right now.

    More to follow when I have some spare time.

    Mike
     
  4. wmcbride

    wmcbride TrainBoard Member

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    Wow! That is superb work!
     
  5. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 HOn30 & N Scales Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Stunning. I am at a loss for words.
     
  6. Smithsr

    Smithsr TrainBoard Member

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    I'm a fan or your work.
    This is an amazing layout and I never tire of reading your notes and seeing the photos! There's so much to see in each picture.. look how much age and wear your photos depict. Beautiful dirty industry.
     
  7. StickyMonk

    StickyMonk Staff Member

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    Awesome work, I have always liked the Guilford livery ever since my departed friend modeled it.

    and your rickety track looks like my best attempt at mainline trackage... I would like to see how you did it.
     
  8. Primavw

    Primavw TrainBoard Member

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    Amazing!!!
     
  9. Colonel

    Colonel Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Wow what an awesome layout oh and love the VW beetle in the first photo

    Looking forward to more updates
     
  10. mikelhh

    mikelhh TrainBoard Member

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  11. mikelhh

    mikelhh TrainBoard Member

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    As the single mainline turns onto the second part of the L, I used curved Peco turnouts to split it into two and then three lines.

    [​IMG]

    All three lines are heading towards plate girder bridges that span a shallow river. The lefthand line has now been terminated just beyond the river, but it has a switchback to serve a small industry..

    [​IMG]

    The plate girder bridges and river...

    [​IMG]

    I made the abutments out of balsa and clay.

    The end of the line...

    [​IMG]

    Rock was made with water putty.

    That's as far as it goes. I hope to continue it around the corner some day.

    Mike
     
  12. Brian K

    Brian K TrainBoard Member

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    Wow!! All of the photos and modeling is great, but this is my favorite out of all of them. Everything just looks right in this scene.

    Brian
     
  13. JimJ

    JimJ Staff Member

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    A true work of art. Ridiculously realistic.
     
  14. Mike VE2TRV

    Mike VE2TRV TrainBoard Member

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    Absolutely stunning. Looks so realistic I'm glad I didn't put away my winter coat yet.
     
  15. FriscoCharlie

    FriscoCharlie Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Incredible! Another example that should be held up as the finest that model railroading has to offer.

    Charlie
     
  16. SecretWeapon

    SecretWeapon TrainBoard Member

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    Love your stuff Mike!
     
  17. Alan

    Alan Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Can fully endorse this comment. Absolutely superlative work.

    Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk 2
     
  18. Sirfoldalot

    Sirfoldalot TrainBoard Member

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    WOW ... I had to look several minutes at the plate girder bridges and river scene to convince myself that I was looking at a model. Thumbs up all way round.
     
  19. mikelhh

    mikelhh TrainBoard Member

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    Thanks again for all the kind comments!

    I use NCE Power Cab to run the locos, although many in the fleet are not yet converted to DCC.

    All switches are controlled manually.

    I've had fun installing lighting in quite a few places. Mostly I've used grain-of-wheat bulbs, although in some places I've used LEDs.

    Here the building's interior is lit by two streetlights glued into the corners. The design of the lights allows the bulbs to be well clear of the plastic walls. I had so many of those lights that I'll never have enough streets to accommodate them.

    [​IMG]

    All streetlights are cheapies from China purchased through Ebay.

    This next building, a DPM kit, is lit with a string of tiny 1.5 mm bulbs, soldered together in series. Also bought via Ebay.

    [​IMG]

    The building still hasn't been bedded-in properly.

    I've also had fun putting lighting in the backscenes - or rather, behind them. I drill small holes of varying sizes, and I glue on some warm white LED strip. Some of the LEDs line up with the holes resulting in a bright light, while others just miss, and the lights are softer.

    This was the first test of the idea, using a small backscene that I often use as a backdrop for photos

    [​IMG]

    and on a permanent backscene

    [​IMG]

    I have a couple more places where I can do the same thing.

    Mike
     
  20. Colonel

    Colonel Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    This would have to be one of the most realistic layouts i have ever seen. I have been showing some rather senior people in rail here in Sydney and they are so impressed with the detail, i'm proud to be able to show people what model railroading can be all about
     

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