Question Which Dremel?

Raytl Jan 21, 2017

  1. Curn

    Curn TrainBoard Member

    695
    319
    28
    I’ve been using a cheap mini rotary tool for a while now, and I’m very happy with it. It’s quite a bit better than the finger nail polishing ones. I modified mine by drilling the collar’s ID a little larger so that it could accept a Dremmel 4486 keyless chuck. You can find these sold under a variety of brand names and colors. They have a micro-usb port for charging, the battery lasts a reasonable amount of time, they have 3 speed settings, and is great for small projects.

    4671FCA8-4AAC-4222-A9A3-28C42001141A.jpeg

    77A06D33-7D80-4E75-AD98-F305C128F875.jpeg
     
    CNE1899 and Kurt Moose like this.
  2. SJ Z-man

    SJ Z-man TrainBoard Member

    2,813
    681
    50
    The collet size is another point. The Nail Files and some others are not the same collet/shaft size (like ancient Inch for Dremel and rest of modern world Metric. I did the same bore out but not for the ones I use on the trains.
     
  3. MRLdave

    MRLdave TrainBoard Member

    783
    87
    22
    I have a cordless dremel that I like, but it is weak on power. It works OK for most hobby applications, but if you put even a slight amount of excess pressure, it shuts down.....not stops, but shuts down completely. To get it working again, you have to shut the switch off and then restart. I pretty much rely on my corded one to avoid the hassle. I also have an old Black&Decker one that uses 1.5 volt stick batteries........plenty of power, but only 2 speeds, so it mostly gets used for heavy grinding and cut-off duty. As noted, cutting track can be a problem with fatter units, but for that I have one of these https://www.micromark.com/Dremel-Flex-Shaft.
     
    CNE1899 and bostonjim like this.
  4. sd90ns

    sd90ns TrainBoard Member

    946
    969
    33
    Any Dremel is better than no Dremel.
    Put another way; you can fix anything if you use enough Dremel.
     
    gmorider likes this.
  5. ubiminor

    ubiminor TrainBoard Member

    32
    71
    3
    I bought few years ago this little jewel for 25 Euros (with all the things you see in the picture)
    It comes with 5 different collets and it is also compatible with dremel chucks and tools.
    Battery lasts fairly long, electronic continuous speed regulation gets always the right speed.
    Since I have this, my expensive and corded dremel has never gone out of its box.
    I am still amazed by its quality, even the box, despite having fallen few times on the floor does not have a crack.

    [​IMG]
     
    CNE1899 and Kurt Moose like this.
  6. Rohit Mohan

    Rohit Mohan New Member

    1
    1
    1
    I'm going to sound spoilt, but anyway... I have the Dremel 8220 (cordless) and the 4300 (corded). Bought both as refurbished from CPO at a good saving, and they came as brand new. Initially started with the 8220, but it too heavy to use handheld, and was getting a little hard to use that with the Flex shaft.

    I now use the 8220 for any cordless work. And the 4300 at my desk, with the flex shaft and a foot pedal (search for a woodworkers pedal) to turn on and off the tool. This is great, as you can quickly pick up and put down the tool - Else it requires you to shuffle a tiny model and a live rotary tool. I wish Dremel allowed for a variable speed trigger, like most die grinders - But the foot pedal is a reasonable alternative.

    Also, get a good vise with the Dremel - One which can hold the tool or a small scale model. Sometimes you'll lock the model down and hold the tool - While at other times, you'll hold the tool down and hold the model.

    What I've written would probably hold true for all rotary tools - Just buy a brand where replacement parts, accessories and brushes are easy to find, and you'll have a tool which you can use for many years.
     
    CNE1899 likes this.
  7. Z train things

    Z train things TrainBoard Member

    25
    56
    3
    Quote It is very hard to find these super thin abrasive cut off discs, don’t make very small gaps in the rail but still way bigger than a razors saw.

    Jeff, it is easy to get .007 thin cut off disks. I use them in my lab all the time. They are very fragile because of their thinness, but they sure make thin cuts IMG_1135.JPG IMG_1136.JPG . They are sold in a box of 25 and you need a good mandrill also.
    I'm not in my lab now, but if anyone is interested I can get you the price that I pay for them . Contact me at lorensnyder18@gmail.com
     

Share This Page