Weathering Freight Cars - Techniques and Examples

corporaldan Oct 3, 2008

  1. Smokestack Lightning

    Smokestack Lightning TrainBoard Member

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    How did you do your super realistic rust spots?
     
  2. ratled

    ratled TrainBoard Supporter

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    There are several out there that do good work but I offer this.

    No one should have tolerate paint fumes when working. A GOOD spray booth and and a respiratory mask would be cheaper for you in the long run. There are some guys peddling trash on Flea Bay and getting $20 - $100 a car. There are some good guys selling on Flea Bay and elsewhere and getting $50 - $200 a car. Then there are some amazing guys who get over $200 car!!!

    Also have you considered working with Gouache paints -Mike Rose has a nice how to DVD out that uses these water based paints with GREAT results. Scotty Mason of the Scottty Mason Show has it on his website http://scottymason.com/dvd/4/

    ratled
     
  3. Jon Grant

    Jon Grant TrainBoard Member

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    I get quite good results using either Vallejo or Humbrol acrylics, which do not smell. some acrylics such as Tamiya and Polly Scale can be quite pungent. Here are a few HO cars weathered with acrylic, applied with a brush. My eyes aren't good enough for N

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Hope this inspires you to have a go yourself. It's an infectious part of the hobby

    Jon
     
  4. nscalerone

    nscalerone TrainBoard Member

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    I cannot tolerate ANY fumes of sprayed paint, acylic or otherwise, but "Thank you" for the recommendation on the "Mike Rose" DVD, that looks interesting, and perhaps, workable...........I've got an email out to him as we "speak".
     
  5. MikeRose

    MikeRose New Member

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    I just wanted to thank those who have recommended my weathering DVD, which is available directly from me. And I wanted to clarify that although there are paint and fading techniques on the DVD, primarily I'm working with artists tube oil colors and odorless mineral spirits, demonstrating various techniques. I actually do a whole car side, from a prototype photo, on camera in real time on the disk. Thanks!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 3, 2010
  6. riog66

    riog66 TrainBoard Member

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    A coupla "patch jobs"

    Although no real unique weathering techniques, I did do a patch job on these hoppers
    I used a different font to the original lettering on each and even managed to get the numbers of the WP 3 bay slightly off so it looked like a "real patch" :tb-biggrin:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. dieselfan1

    dieselfan1 Guest

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    What about those weathering powders?
     
  8. riog66

    riog66 TrainBoard Member

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    BN 2Bay hopper

    I can't seem to get away from weathering hoppers
    Haven't really tried anything new here, but basically:
    - Light grey overspray to tone down the factory finish & shine
    - Wash of black diluted with Microsol
    - Some spills and small rust spots
    - MT #905 Z scale couplers body mounted
    I used the prototype pic as inspiration but eliminated the graffiti to reflect my era

    [​IMG]
     

    Attached Files:

  9. G&G Railway

    G&G Railway TrainBoard Member

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    Here is some interesting information on weathering
     

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  10. Train Kid

    Train Kid TrainBoard Member

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    That was great information. Trouble is I don't have that kind of time or patience. Like somebody else here said recently (forgot who) --- i like my stuff clean. :p
     
  11. Taylor D729

    Taylor D729 TrainBoard Member

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    I have been messing around with a bit of weathering here and there, and sometimes I feel that the cars look terrible, but other people think they look great. Here is a Kato NW-12 in UP that has been neglected for years even though it works hard every single day. [​IMG] and a B&M trailer that has done some serious miles. [​IMG] I have a few more things that i have weathered that I will post later.
     
  12. riog66

    riog66 TrainBoard Member

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    ExactRail hopper

    I picked up half a dozen ExactRail PS 4427 Hoppers in diff. road numbers
    Haven't weathered them all, but started on a few just to see how they'd turn out

    Attached pic shows a new car out of the box & one of my weathered units
    Several washes / airbrushed oversprays & some detailed spills
    Trucks / couplers and underbody airbrushed with road grime


    MT Z #905's are body mounted but the camera angle doesn't show them - trust me they're there and they do a great job shortening the coupling distance between cars

    I have weathered the others to a lesser extent than this one
     

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  13. FLG

    FLG TrainBoard Member

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    for a wash how do you all prevent the "pooling" affect of the wash? i use acrylic paints that are diluted with alcohol with several attempts of 1. letting sit and dry with multiple layers and 2. apply then take a damp paper towel and pull the excess off.
     
  14. jhn_plsn

    jhn_plsn TrainBoard Supporter

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    In my opinion the alcohol dries to fast so I use paint thinner or distilled water, but the thinner is better. Try applying the wash and then dip a fan type brush in some thinner or water if that is what you used and pat it out a little on a towel. Then while the wash is still wet draw the brush downward on the car and it will pull a little paint from here and there but will leave some random color in the grooves and seems. Use light pressure with the brush.
    I like to use oils myself as they will take a day or two to dry and if I don't like the results I use a wet brush and most will be removed. Waiting a few hours or a day for some of the wash to dry allows the paint to partially cure creating some very cool streaks and color variations.
    Here is a set of N scale cars I recently weathered for a fellow club member. The only thing I wish I could have changed are to have metal wheels.
     

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  15. Flash Blackman

    Flash Blackman Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    As you say, if you use paint thinner, that is not acrylic. I have used acrylic for a long time and have just started with petroleum based thinners. I agree with you that they work better than acrylics.

    Also, when you streak the paint, it must be vertical. I sometimes miss on that. I want to get a block or something to steady my hand.
     
  16. riog66

    riog66 TrainBoard Member

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    Nice subtle weathering on those Katy hoppers John
     
  17. y0chang

    y0chang TrainBoard Member

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    P1000431.jpg P1000429.jpg P1000436.jpg woodcraft.jpg
    My first water based weathering job on some of my older cheap cars. I started with flat black acrylic wash. Then I tried using a ZIG alcohol pen then wiping off to get a dusty effect. This worked really well, I'm gonna try to find some other colors and try out, they were in the woodcraft section of Michaels. Doing some wipe in a downward motion with paper towels and Q Tips. I still need to weather the passenger car trucks and maybe add some rust. Water based weathering over enamel paint is a cinch to try ideas or undo since water or alcohol will wipe off mistakes but not touch the paint underneath. I think I'll try a less extreme example next time, but its almost hard to mess up weathering. I did find if put too much wash it would pool up if the car side was horizontal. Either wiping downward with alcohol or water or using a wash with less paint worked out well.
     
  18. TrCO

    TrCO TrainBoard Member

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    I had this on my old comp. which bit the dust last year. I've spent the last 4 months trying to find it again-thank you!!!
     
  19. mikelhh

    mikelhh TrainBoard Member

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    I hadnt seen this thread before.
    I like those hoppers, John.
    I'd put in a vote for oils as well. I reckon I get more control with them, no pooling of the paint, and pastels grab nicely if needed.

    Mike
     
  20. TrCO

    TrCO TrainBoard Member

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    Here's my latest effort. Started with powdering the roof and upper sides, then used a spot of acrylic at the bottom of each walkway post, dragged down with a fan brush, and then lightly dusted from top to bottom with powders. Not sure why those colors, but they seemed right to me.

    [​IMG]
     

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