Storytime with Charlie

Charlie Mar 31, 2007

  1. Kurt Moose

    Kurt Moose TrainBoard Member

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    I dunno either, but it's amazing to watch it all working in unison!! Engineers must've just got it done by feel, practice, and the seat of they're pants!
    (y)
     
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  2. Charlie

    Charlie TrainBoard Member

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    I think it was mostly by 'feel", but then again, never having run a steam locomotive, I cant say for sure.

    Charlie
     
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  3. r_i_straw

    r_i_straw Staff Member

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    It would seem to me that it would be hard to compress a train in a helper situation. The helpers would be pushing with all they have just to make the grade. By the time that there would be a problem at the top, they were usually stopping anyway to remove the helpers. But I imagine starting out if it was before the grade started, one would have to go by feel.
     
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  4. Charlie

    Charlie TrainBoard Member

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    What I can say for sure is that when you are sitting in that righthand seat, you actually can "feel" the action of your train. You can sense if the power is working hard(you can hear that too), you can feel the results of a throttle change, you can feel the brakes "soaking in"(or not!). You can feel the power tugging when you are ascending a grade AND you can definitely feel the slack run in when you are going downgrade.

    Charlie
     
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  5. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    I think our guess that it was done "by the seat of the pants" is pretty likely then. I do know that even steel underframe cabooses were sometimes crushed from the force of pushers, resulting in the Clinchfield scene above where the caboose was coupled on behind the pushers to keep the rear end crew safe. This rule varied by road, as it greatly increased the time needed to add and remove pushers to a train.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2020
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  6. HemiAdda2d

    HemiAdda2d Staff Member

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    D&RGW also had an 8 powered axles rule. A pair of Geeps or single SD behind the caboose was permissible, but more than 2 units had to be entrained ahead of the caboose. The curves and grade necessitated this for the reasons mentioned, although I don't know if a derailment on D&RGW drove the change. It could have simply been a railroad best practice shared between roads. http://www.drgw.net/gallery/v/EmployeeTTs/ETTColoDiv9/drgw_colodiv9_19_apr_1970_p22_23.jpg.html

     
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  7. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    That's really interesting Hemi! (y)
     

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