N scale "What's on your workbench?"

Mark Watson Oct 28, 2009

  1. John Moore

    John Moore TrainBoard Supporter

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    Well preparing the loads. Cut some plastic out as a base then used Elmer's to affix some Arizona fine ballast to it. Then put some of the ballast in a small dish and started adding color.


    These were the colors used. Moly ore has a bluish tint to it. Once the material dried the mortar and pestle were used to grind to a coarse powder.


    The loads are in and some loose material on top. The four cars on the right were the ones done, the 3 cars on the left are 20 years old now.


    The car on the left is the original paint and lettering scheme. The car on the right is the new paint celebrating the 150 years that Macie Moly Mines has been in service.

     
  2. John Moore

    John Moore TrainBoard Supporter

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  3. Shortround

    Shortround TrainBoard Member

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    In the first picture, is that a Mortise and Pestle in the back ground?
     
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  4. John Moore

    John Moore TrainBoard Supporter

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    Yes it is my big one made of granite. You can beat and grind things to a fine powder in that. I also have one made of porcelain and one of wood.
     
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  5. Espeeman

    Espeeman TrainBoard Member

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    If they look anywhere near as good as the dozen I bought from you ten or so years ago then I am sure they look great!
     
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  6. Pfunk

    Pfunk TrainBoard Member

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    Regret, that's what :LOL:

    Decided it would be far easier to make my city station out of wood than styrene because of all the exact corners and such, but I don't have a fine enough blade for the table saw and it would chew the board it to bits. Tried a microsaw and it flexes too much so the ends didn't come off even remotely square.

    And I won't mention who *cough cough*, but someone bought the cheapest table saw Lowes had when he bought this place and never stopped to think that no one actually carries 8.25" blades so now I have to order an 80-tooth off the interwebs and wait for it to work on this any more.

    20220611_115419.jpg
     
  7. logging loco

    logging loco TrainBoard Supporter

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    How about cutting just outside the line with a coping saw then sanding to the final dimensions?
     
  8. Shortround

    Shortround TrainBoard Member

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    Thanks for the information. I've been thinking of a little table saw as well.
     
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  9. freddy_fo

    freddy_fo TrainBoard Member

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    That wood seems pretty thick creating more of a chore than it should. I quite like styrene as I think it's easy to work with provided you have enough sharp blades to get you through a job. Score (sometimes multiple passes with a metal straight edge), break and sand. A mitre/miter sander is a handy tool to have as well. I have a 20+ year old one from fourmost and have got a ton of mileage with it.

    I also enjoy working with scale lumber too and prefer it for scale buildings when I get the urge to scratch build. I use all of the same tools as styrene builds. The big difference is the initial score which has to be done carefully so the blade stays on the straight edge rather than follow the grain of the wood. Other than that a pass or two and your cut is complete making quick work of initial fabrication. Northeastern scale lumber has a great selection but there are several other competitors out there like midwest too.

    A good needle file set is recommended as well for fine tuning/squaring up window openings and such.
     
  10. Pfunk

    Pfunk TrainBoard Member

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    Is a piece I had leftover from a home project so tried it, thinking FREE was better than having to buy mats. I wanted this to be a little bulkier because it is a concrete building to begin with, but after rough cutting a few of the piecesparts today, it's clear it's going to be TOO bulky with the rest of the structures. I have to get something thinner. So, whether I have to get a finer blade or thinner lumber, Nobeoka Station ain't happening today. I guess I should just stop procrastinating and go mow already hahaha

    Besides, if the things we tried first always worked out then I'm willing to bet none of us would value the things we've actually completed nearly as much. There needs to be some swearing, maybe even a blood sacrifice to the modeling gods before something has real value :ROFLMAO:
     
  11. freddy_fo

    freddy_fo TrainBoard Member

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    I totally get it pfunk. When I was a kid and had no money I used to build structures with poster board that was laying around the house because it was laying around the house lol.
     
  12. BigJake

    BigJake TrainBoard Member

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    The following characteristics dominate cut quality on table saws (assuming the saw itself is reasonably well built, with a true arbor and zero end-play):
    1. The miter gauge/fence alignment with the blade (square/parallel to blade), and their ability to stay that way in use. Miter gauge fit in slot (no play.) The fence should lock down parallel to blade or very slightly toed outward at the rear .
    2. The right blade for the material (i.e. tooth geometry) Carbide teeth are usually more accurately shaped than steel teeth/blades. Check out a major saw blade manufacturer like Freud, etc. I would look at blades made for laminate surfaces (e.g. Formica, etc.). High quality blades are not cheap.
    3. Blade sharpness. Carbide stays sharp far longer than steel.
     
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  13. logging loco

    logging loco TrainBoard Supporter

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    Looking at photos of Nobeoka Station I would go with Evergreen or Plastruct styrene or whichever brand would have the size closest to the numerous columns.
     
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  14. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    Some guys take the extra step to buy a zero clearance throat plate to minimize tear out. I've never bothered with one, but on some cuts I place painter's tape on the bottom edge and and run the piece through my table saw with the best side up. That usually eliminates tear out and, as @Pfunk mentioned, an 80 Tooth blade is also a helpful ally. (y)
     
  15. Pfunk

    Pfunk TrainBoard Member

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    There are some structures I'll have to do with styrene, but find working with wood much, much easier most of the time, especially with all the little cutouts for the posts that this is going to require. Already have all the square columns, have the cardstock cut to dimension - know exactly how I want to go at this bugger. I ordered some 3/16 balsa sheet, should be significantly easier, it cuts pretty easy with just a hobby knife. I just don't have enough of it on-hand anymore.

    Am not going for any faithful reproduction either, here - just my own personal spin on it. I actually had no idea they'd built a new station until I went hunting for a specific landmark I knew in Nobeoka and kinda fell in love with it.
     
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  16. Tad

    Tad TrainBoard Supporter

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    Resurrecting a long stalled project. ADN 1810 & ADN 1811.

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  17. Allen H

    Allen H TrainBoard Supporter

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    Looking forward to following this, who doesn't like a good Chop Nosed Geep!

    Did you scratch those filter boxes Tad?
    I do believe someone makes those on Shapeways?
     
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  18. Tad

    Tad TrainBoard Supporter

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    Thanks, Allen.

    The air filters are Mocalova Model Works #60-408. I got them a long time ago.
     
  19. John Moore

    John Moore TrainBoard Supporter

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    Needed a couple more barges to haul ore and found these on Ebay cheap. Took a double ply tissue and cut it to shape then wet it and molded it to the barge. Let it dry then sprayed with dull coat and finally several coats of paint. Instant canvas covers for the loads. The 2nd one I folded back.


    In the back is a charter fishing boat and a dive boat from scratch. Had a section of fishing boat bow left over from another project to which I laminated a new hull to out of styrene. Also had a cabin in my parts box. Shot of the back showing the air compressor for filling dive tanks.


     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2022
  20. logging loco

    logging loco TrainBoard Supporter

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    It's 1:1 not 1:160 but it will help my modeling and hopefully improve the photos in my posts.

    20220622_124225.jpg

    The book is a little dated but so is my Cannon Power Shot.
     

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