N scale tool for placing engine on track

Robert Owen Dec 31, 2021

  1. Robert Owen

    Robert Owen TrainBoard Member

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    Placing my N scale engine on the track has always been difficult. Recently, I saw a video where a flat tool was put on the track, the engine placed on it, and slid off easily onto the track. No problem at all. I looked online but could not find where to buy one. Any suggestions will be appreciated.
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. MK

    MK TrainBoard Member

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  3. wpsnts

    wpsnts TrainBoard Supporter

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    Robert,
    Check your Conversations.
     
  4. thomas

    thomas TrainBoard Member

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    Yeah the Kato rerailer shown below is the best . 51EYQuq7qeL._AC_SL1222_.jpeg
     
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  5. Moose2013

    Moose2013 TrainBoard Member

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    Moose have three different rerailer ramps (or is it re-railer ramps?). Moose was once asked which one Moose prefer. Moose now prepared to answer this all important question...

    The contenders:

    (a) Kato # 24000, Blue, multi-functional, $1.19
    (b) Rix # 628-0003, Black, $2.99
    (c) Micro-Trains # 98800132, Red, $1.89

    Note: There are several other rerailer ramps, brands like Tomix, Minitrix, DeLux Innovations and Bachmann, but Moose no have any of these to review. Some might just be rebranded versions of others. Moose no know...

    The Kato:
    * Includes a rudimentary metric ruler on one side, notches for checking gages and a separate plastic gage as well.
    * Both the front and back ends of the ramp include features to align the ramp with the track.
    * The front end sits above the track, so there is a wee drop to the track.
    * The incline is the lowest of the three ramps.
    * Similar length as Micro-Train ramp.

    The Rix:
    * Includes - nothing. Nada. Zilch.
    * The front end of the ramp includes feature to align the ramp with the track. The back end has features to help keep it roughly over the track.
    * The front end uses a slotted design that secures the track between the sides and allows the wheels to contact the track well aft of the ramp end. Seems to work quite well on Kato Unitrack, but less so on Atlas Code 55 track.
    * The incline falls between the Kato and the Micro-Trains ramps.
    * Longest of the three ramps.

    The Micro-Trains:
    * Includes - nothing. Nada. Zilch.
    * The front end of the ramp includes features to align the ramp with the track. The back end has features to help keep it roughly over the track.
    * The front end sits above the track, so there is a wee drop to the track.
    * The incline is the steepest of the three ramps. As such, it is the most fun to relive mooselet days with Hot Wheels & Johnny Lightning cars on steep incline tracks - oh yea!

    #1: Kato: Moose prefer Kato for easy-to-find colour, easy alignment to track, low incline means less fuss with rolling stock running away, and it's the least expensive ... Above all else, it's a Kato.

    #2: Micro-Trains: Moose found M-T ramp a close second since most Kato features are not usually used, and there's the fun factor of rolling cars down the ramp!

    #3: Rix: Coming in last and with the largest price is the Rix ... Longer means better if you have a Mallard to place on the track, errr, Mallet, and that's where this ramp will come in most handy ... Assuming you can find it - it's molded in that wonderful hard-to-see black plastic!
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2021
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  6. acptulsa

    acptulsa TrainBoard Member

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    Mallet. Rhymes with ballet. Don't know why. They aren't light on their feet. Black locomotives can't jump. A tutu wouldn't do a thing for it. But it's true, nonetheless.
     
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  7. Moose2013

    Moose2013 TrainBoard Member

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    It's French... :rolleyes:
     
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  8. acptulsa

    acptulsa TrainBoard Member

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    Oui, oui.

    Uh oh. Please excuse me a minute. Power of suggestion...
     
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  9. Shortround

    Shortround TrainBoard Member

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    Hmm! Yes Sister Agnes. :oops:
     
  10. NtheBasement

    NtheBasement TrainBoard Member

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    I've got a Micro Trains and a Rix. The Rix worked fine on my old layout's Atlas flex but it won't sit flat on my ME c55 flex so I no longer use it. Apparently ME's ties are longer than Atlas's.
     
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  11. Carl Sowell

    Carl Sowell TrainBoard Supporter

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    Robert,

    Here is a short Y-T video that I made demonstrating a DIY powered re-railer. I made this primarily to make railing my big steamers without pushing them down the ramp. I made some changes to the "thing" after making this video, such as running the conductive tape all the way to the bottom where it contacted the rails. This was mainly "for fun" but it was worth the effort and yes the Bachmann tool gave me the idea to try.



    Check out the link that MK posted above.

    Be well,
    Carl
     
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  12. Shortround

    Shortround TrainBoard Member

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    I was wondering about such a device. Thanks for showing us yours.
     
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  13. BigJake

    BigJake TrainBoard Member

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    The only rerailers I have used are the Kato blue model, and the Kato Unitrack road crossing.

    Note the Kato blue rerailer also has a track spacing gauge (with notches for the rails) for double and triple tracks on standard 33mm (?) spacing.

    The road crossing is really just intended to re-rail cars in trains that might have thrown a wheel over the rail elsewhere on the layout. They are handy in yards or on sidings for that purpose, and especially on hidden tracks. They are is not as easy to use for placing a car/loco on the tracks, but have the advantage of not needing to be removed from the track before the [next] train passes through. Don't ask me how I know that...

    If your layout is so equipped, you could use a modified car float or cassette.

    Next up: a crane to hoist your locomotive or rolling stock onto the rerailer ramp (aka rerailer reloader).
     
  14. Metro Red Line

    Metro Red Line TrainBoard Member

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    I bought the Rix rerailer when I started out in N scale 15 years ago.

    Since then, my hands got used to N scale sizes and I never really used it again. :D
     
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  15. BigJake

    BigJake TrainBoard Member

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    Yeah, I often don't use my Kato rerailer unless I have a bunch of cars to put on the track. A lot depends on whether the rerailer's whereabouts are both known and handy to get to, compared to the number of cars I need to put on the track.
     

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