Lubrication

cosmic Apr 5, 2014

  1. cosmic

    cosmic TrainBoard Supporter

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    Come on now Jack. Seems to have something to do with our hobby.:)
     
  2. engineer bill

    engineer bill TrainBoard Supporter

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    everything you "never" wanted to know check ...BOB IS THE OIL GUY......lots to ponder
     
  3. cosmic

    cosmic TrainBoard Supporter

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    He's got a couple of chapters there discussing the differences between synthetic and mineral oils. I scanned them and there's information there. I'll read it all later at my leisure, which is not now at 2:10 AM.
     
  4. Point353

    Point353 TrainBoard Member

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    The drift to synthetic automotive lubricants isn't entirely off topic.
    This post [http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/1932] suggests using synthetic auto transmission fluid for model trains.

    That being said, I've used Labelle lubes on my trains for decades without any issues - 106 grease on gears and 108 light (synthetic) oil elsewhere. The only time I lube the driveshaft at the motor is on those units with so much running time that they start to squeal.
     
  5. rrjim1

    rrjim1 TrainBoard Member

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    I manufactured HO slot car parts, and tools for years, (JW'S HO Slot Car Parts), small CNC shop, sold it a few years ago. I also sold the best oil I could find, I tested every oil I could get my hands on. Running a chassis on a Dyno, then disassembling it, cleaning it in a real Ultrasonic Cleaner, and trying another oil. Best oil I found was a Synthetic oil with Teflon, one thing nice about it is, if you get any on the motor brushed is will not short them out causing smoke.
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    I purchased a 2013 Ford Focus ST, it requires 5W30 full synthetic, I would rather run 5W40 but it's very had to find.
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    The problem with some synthetic auto transmission oils, is that not all of them are a light weight oil needed for n-scale locos. If your not sure what oil to use, go with a proven model railroad product, like LaBelle.
     
  6. mtntrainman

    mtntrainman TrainBoard Supporter

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    I use Wahl Clipper Oil. Have for years. One small drop on one gear thru the bottom of each truck after I strip and clean the truck. For the naysayers....Wahl Clipper Oil will NOT damage the paint or plastic on model trains.
     
  7. Doug Gosha

    Doug Gosha TrainBoard Member

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    I have lubed motor shafts at the bearings for over 50 years and have rarely, if ever, had any problem with contamination of brushes or commutators. Also, if lubricant does get in those places (from over lubrication), it doesn't short them out directly. It just builds up and causes brush material to accumulate in the slots and current flows through it and - smoke.

    Related to this, I have always gotten a kick out of modern engineering and the insistance that certain gears do not need lubrication because they are self-lubricating. You should have seen the ground-to-dust gears in the HP Laserjet IIIPs we used to use in hearing aid testing where I used to work. I dared disobey the HP commandments and lubed them after replacement and they were then fine for a long, long time.

    Doug
     
  8. rrjim1

    rrjim1 TrainBoard Member

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    Then tell me why back in 1963 when I used 3in1 oil to lube my slot cars, and over oil one and it surely did smoke! The pancake armature didn't have slots. I had to save up for a couple weeks to purchase a replace armature that only cost $.98.
     
  9. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 HOn30 & N Scales Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Modern sales technique? Don't lube, so it wears out or fails faster. Seems like a rather sleazy way to sell either expensive parts and labor, or new equipment.
     
  10. Doug Gosha

    Doug Gosha TrainBoard Member

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    Yeah, 98 cents was a lot of money for a kid in those days. :D

    What happened was sparks set the oil on fire and caused the smoke and also burnt the commutator plates. I actually meant to mention that too but I forgot.

    Another thing is that the excess oil will combine with dirt and carbon and coat the commutator and stop current flow, stopping the motor dead.

    Doug
     
  11. Doug Gosha

    Doug Gosha TrainBoard Member

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    Could be. It seems there have been some model railroad manufacturers who have claimed the same thing.

    It could also be engineers with big enough egos who think they really have something. \:^)

    Doug
     
  12. Hytec

    Hytec TrainBoard Member

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    Planned obsolescence, a product development philosophy where the design tolerances are so tight that the product can be predicted to fail under normal use within a few months after the warrant expires. I agree that it's not ethical, just an accepted practice in most of the retail product market.
     
  13. Mark.S+10

    Mark.S+10 TrainBoard Member

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    Doug,

    What synthetic oil did your slot car testing revel was the best?

    Thanks, Mark
     
  14. Doug Gosha

    Doug Gosha TrainBoard Member

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    Who me? I was only involved in slot cars for a relatively short period of time with Aurora Model Motoring HO cars. I always just used their red oil.

    I do still have my original set, however, the Stirling Moss Thunderjet 500 "Speedway" set #1302. It was $24.95 in 1964.

    Doug
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 6, 2014
  15. Mark.S+10

    Mark.S+10 TrainBoard Member

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    Sorry Doug, the question should have been addressed to rrjim1. Let me try again:

    Rrjim, what synthetic oil with Teflon did your slot car test show was the best.

    Thanks, Mark
     
  16. rrjim1

    rrjim1 TrainBoard Member

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    Mark, I really can't tell you, the guy that purchased my business might get just a little upset. I will tell you it was a special blend of 2 different synthetic oils.
     
  17. Mark.S+10

    Mark.S+10 TrainBoard Member

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    Rrjim,

    No problem, I didn't realize the new owner was selling the stuff for $7 per half oz. when I asked the question.

    Thanks, Mark
     
  18. rrjim1

    rrjim1 TrainBoard Member

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    Well worth the price if it helps you win a race, took me several years of testing to come up with this blend. You can also get this on a motor's brushes and it won't make smoke.
     
  19. Point353

    Point353 TrainBoard Member

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    FWIW, Pete @ BLW used to recommend a combination of Labelle light weight oil #108 and their micro powdered PTFE (aka Teflon) #134.

    Although I haven't tried it, Labelle #102, a medium weight gear oil, has been reformulated to include PTFE. http://www.con-cor.com/Labelle.html

    And then there's this thread: http://www.trainboard.com/grapevine/showthread.php?124860-Labelle-lubricants-which-one-for-N-scale
     

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