Lubrication

cosmic Apr 5, 2014

  1. cosmic

    cosmic TrainBoard Supporter

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    I was looking for lubrication suitable for the rehabilitation of a few filthy locomotives I acquired, and came across "Liquid Bearings Synthetic Oil" on eBay. I was intrigued by the seller's seemingly intelligent description of the advantages of the product, enough so to ask the question, "Are you saying that this very fluid lubricant is superior to any viscous grease for such as worm gear sets?"

    His response was, "Absolutely yes. Most greases get extruded out of the area of interest quickly anyway, and they always dry and become sticky with time. Liquid Bearings does neither, sheeting out to a molecular thin layer which does not move unless washed away, and it never degrades and becomes sticky. It is simply the superior lubricant for virtually all applications except sealed bearings."

    Anyone have experience with this stuff, or can otherwise offer any informed criticism of it, pro or con?
     
  2. Run8Racing

    Run8Racing TrainBoard Member

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    I'm not familiar with that product, but if it never wore out, it would be IDEAL for sealed bearings !!! Kinda' raises a flag, ya' know ??? Stick with Labelle. Others may mention other products, but that's cool. Never had much faith in "wonder products". There are reasons they aren't around very long. If you're gonna' lube something, use a product based on rotten dinosaurs. It's very well proven, and been around a long time !!!
     
  3. cosmic

    cosmic TrainBoard Supporter

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    Oh, the meaning I got out of it was that in a sealed bearing the lubricant is not (easily?) accessible.
     
  4. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 HOn30 & N Scales Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Not familiar with this specific product. If it could be acquired in a very small quantity, for a couple of dollars, then it might be worth an experiment....
     
  5. cosmic

    cosmic TrainBoard Supporter

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    It's pricey. $6.99 + 2.49 shipping for a one fluid ounce squeeze bottle.
     
  6. Eagle2

    Eagle2 Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Just for interest, try the auto-inserted link in your first post. Goes to a product by that name (same one?) on Amazon, with a longer description. One review at five stars, $5.99 (didn't check shipping) so may be worth a thought.
     
  7. cosmic

    cosmic TrainBoard Supporter

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    Yup, same stuff, same package. Amazon price I read as $6.99 + 4.49 shipping.
     
  8. jtomstarr

    jtomstarr TrainBoard Member

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    What about the old standby grease'm, isn't that still available?

    Tom
     
  9. Hytec

    Hytec TrainBoard Member

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    FYI, this is Liquid Bearings home page. I was not able to locate any reviews more recent than 3-4 years ago, and even those didn't provide much information.
     
  10. Glenn Poole

    Glenn Poole TrainBoard Member

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    Does anyone put a drop of oil on the shaft where it comes out of the motor? Or, are the gears the only thing you lubricate?
     
  11. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 HOn30 & N Scales Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    In the past, I have seen an instance or two where such lubing at the motor didn't work out well. The oil managed to migrate through to the inside and.... :(
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 5, 2014
  12. robwill84

    robwill84 TrainBoard Member

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    Yeah, do NOT put oil on the motor shaft. It will migrate into the motor brushes, and will build up dirt, the motor will smoke, all sorts of bad stuff. The motors we use do not need any additional lubrication.
     
  13. cosmic

    cosmic TrainBoard Supporter

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    I would lubricate at least every metal surface that bears on another (with the exception of brushes & commutator of course). I don't believe the lubricant will migrate if not over applied. At least that's my experience with other small mechanisms. Sufficient goes where it's needed. Any excess goes where it wants.
     
  14. John Moore

    John Moore TrainBoard Supporter

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    I am not against trying a new product that could improve things but the synthetic oil has been out in the automotive market now about 20 years and it still hasn't caught on. If it was that good you would think that the automotive manufacturers would have started using in their lines long ago. And I have never used any type of grease. I have had locos come with what amounted to gobs of the stuff and it is a recipe for a problem later. Nothing cakes up worse than grease especially if it has had a little dust introduced in the mix and it is danged hard to get rid off even in a ultra sound bath with strong detergent and warm water. I only use LaBelles oil and then very sparingly and occasionally light sewing machine oil that is for plastic gears. And I do sometimes apply oil the motor shaft bearings however very sparingly again. How sparingly one asked? Well I have had the same little plastic bottle of LaBelles now just about 2o years that is how sparingly.
     
  15. Mike C

    Mike C TrainBoard Member

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    There is another product called Nano Oil that I have read about in the MRH forum. It sounded interesting....Mike
     
  16. Point353

    Point353 TrainBoard Member

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    Hasn't caught on? Where have you been looking?
    Most German cars now have extended drain intervals which require very specific versions of synthetic motor oil. The 0W-20 oil used in many Japanese cars is mostly available only as synthetic. Likewise for the dexos formula oil now used in newer GM vehicles.
     
  17. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 HOn30 & N Scales Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    My comment was based upon experiences and those of others I have know. But, how do we define "sufficient? That is a very nebulous term.
     
  18. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 HOn30 & N Scales Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    It is in widespread use, here in the US. But a stumbling block might be price. It costs more. A quick glance across a couple of national auto parts chains shows prices running in the $3.00 to $4.00 per quart more, (same brand and weight), than non-synthetics. Even with an advertised longer change interval, a lot of people are still squeezing pennies these days.
     
  19. John Moore

    John Moore TrainBoard Supporter

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    Well it may be in some of the newer vehicles the last couple of years but my local shop I go to doesn't push it and probably has to order it when somebody wants it. And all the folks I know don't use it. My youngest vehicle is almost 16 years old and my oldest is 21 years old and both are still running just fine on old dead dinos and prehistoric fermented plants. And the county fleets of vehicles didn't use it at the time I retired about four years ago and probably still don't unless the newer vehicles specifically call for it.
     
  20. jacksibold

    jacksibold TrainBoard Member

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    Actually off subject but I have had a 2004 VW Toureg, a 2006 Audi A4 , a 2008 Toyota Sequoia, a 2011 Audi A6 and now a 2014 Grand Cherokee all of which recommend under warranty synthetic oil and extend the change interval under warranty to 7000, 10000 and more with synthetic oil. Furthermore, a simple google search on recommendations on synthetic oil will reveal a lot of information about synthetic oil depending on how you ask the question. That said, I would speculate none of this has anything to do with our hobby engines and cars.

    Jack
     

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