Gold Watch

JonEMDfan Mar 18, 2020

  1. JonEMDfan

    JonEMDfan TrainBoard Member

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    Hello--My grandfather retired from NYCRR in 1959 or 60. He was a brakeman and or car knocker, according to my
    mother, for many years. He received a watch or pocket watch when he retired. I have never seen it, anyone here know
    what they looked like? Or what brand, Hamilton, Waltham, Elgin? Thanks---John
     
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  2. r_i_straw

    r_i_straw Staff Member

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    This one came from my Father-in-Law's dad who worked for the N&W. This was his railroad issued watch that he used during work. There was a railroad worker who's job was to periodically clean and adjust it. The railroad ran on precise time and it was important that all employees had the best time keeping devices. If the time on the watch had to be reset, you had to unscrew the front bezel and pull on a hidden tab/lever to then be able to adjust the hands to match the other members of the train crew or a station clock.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. JonEMDfan

    JonEMDfan TrainBoard Member

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    NICE! I was hoping to see one given to a rail road worker for retirement. The so called
    "Gold Watch". I believe he worked for the NYCRR for 40 years, 1919-1959 maybe.---John
     
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  4. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    A beautiful watch Russell!

    This is my Hamilton 992 John, "Lever Set" just as Russell describes. This feature prevented the time being accidentally changed by pressing the pendant in, as is done with non-railroad watches.

    I'm not sure if a retirement watch would look different than a regular watch, other than perhaps the employee's name and service anniversary engraved on the rear of the case?

    2013-12-07 Hamilton 992B - for upload.jpg
     
  5. JonEMDfan

    JonEMDfan TrainBoard Member

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    Thanks, you're most likely right. I have never seen one although I was told
    my youngest sibling has my grandfathers'. Not going there. Waste of good
    breath. I also noticed most of these are open faces. I was thinking of buying
    one for nostalgia on e bay. What's best brand? Here is my Pulsar I gave myself
    after my divorce!!! My father had a nice Hamilton wrist watch, a WWII vet. I think
    he might have got it for high school graduation in 1941. He had it till the day he
    died. Clicky pic for full size---John
    Pulsar Quartz pocket watch.JPG
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2020
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  6. JonEMDfan

    JonEMDfan TrainBoard Member

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    Dad's 40s Hamilton, another heirloom that seemed to just "walk off".
    Click to enlarge.---John
    1940s-50s Hamilton.jpg
     
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  7. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    If you want a modern wristwatch with a railroad face, I know that Seiko and Pulsar made them and perhaps still do. They look very nice. I've worn my Seiko railroad wristwatch almost every day for 35 years and it is finally starting to fail. Seiko also makes Japanese railroad pocket watches.

    If you decide to buy an older pocket watch (mine above is ~ 95 years old as best I can figure), be sure it runs. It's getting increasingly difficult to find watchmakers who have the knowledge to service them. I brought my Hamilton to a local jeweler and his first statement was, "This isn't quartz driven". I thanked him and left with my watch in hand.
     
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  8. JonEMDfan

    JonEMDfan TrainBoard Member

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    Thanks, I have a Seiko wristwatch and a Pulsar pocket watch. I forget if it's
    Seko that make Pulsar or Pulsar that makes Seiko. They are one, I think.---John
     
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  9. gjslsffan

    gjslsffan Staff Member

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    I have my Grandpas Hamilton 992-B, I took it to the jeweler that used to certify watches for RR's here. It had a lot of inscribed dates the watch was certified or re-certified. I carried it with me on many trips, I quit carrying it cause I just didn't want to take the chance of loosing or damaging it, the watch kept incredible accurate time. I always thought my grandpa was with me in the cab when carrying it, he was a great grandfather to me. Pretty sure I scared him a couple times, I know I scared me.
     
  10. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    I was once told that many engineers kept their watches in an upper overall pocket at their chest. This kept the watch handy and off the deck, away from firebox heat and grit, and kept its pendant up, assuring that it stood at one of its five adjusted positions.

    [​IMG]

    I was also told that threaded watch cases were more prevalent in the east, while snap cases were more prevalent in the west. It was explained that western railroading was notably dustier and the threads in screwed-on faces would be more easily fouled. Not sure it it's true, but it might have merit.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2020

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