1. urodoji

    urodoji TrainBoard Member

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    GD’s lone 200 ton flatcar.

    IMG_7585.jpeg IMG_7576.jpeg IMG_7583.jpeg IMG_7584.jpeg
     
  2. minesweeper

    minesweeper TrainBoard Member

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    Should the load limit and nt wt add up to capacity? looks like it doesn't
     
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  3. 7dmack

    7dmack TrainBoard Member

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    No, they don't add up like that. I don't know what gross weight (car weight plus load weight) that particular car should have but for modern 286000 lb cars, the LD LMT and LT WT will add to 286k but the 286000 is not stenciled on the car. The standard car gross weights, 263000 and 286000 in recent times, are determined by axle bearing size, wheels and trucks.

    I'm working on a 4 truck flat car built in 1995, and its LT WT (Light, ie unloaded, Weight) is 143500. The LD LMT is determined by subtracting the LT WT from the gross weight as determined by trucks, wheels and bearings. This car grosses at 526000 with 36" wheels and 100 ton trucks with whatever size bearings. That math gives LD LMT of 382500. The same car with 120 ton trucks would be higher as long as the carbody could support the extra weight.

    The CAPY line was no longer required after some date in the early 1990s and I'm not sure what exactly it is. It seems like it is usually within a few hundred pounds of the LD LMT.

    I'm sure there is more to it than that but that is a general overview.
     
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  4. VinceP

    VinceP TrainBoard Member

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  5. urodoji

    urodoji TrainBoard Member

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    Thanks!
     

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