First scratch built structure

Mark Smith Mar 8, 2019

  1. Mark Smith

    Mark Smith TrainBoard Member

    306
    9
    16
    This is my first post in quite awhile. The links take you to two photos of my first scratch-built (not kit-bashed) structure. Built of styrene and attempting to model the coal shed of one of the local businesses in Lansdale, Pa in the 1950's which I am attempting to model. Lansdale was a Reading Railroad town about 25 miles north of Philadelphia and my boyhood hoime.

    https://www.trainboard.com/highball/index.php?media/img_0907.134623/full
    https://www.trainboard.com/highball/index.php?media/img_0914.134624/full

    Mark
     
    JoeTodd, Kurt Moose, SP-Wolf and 3 others like this.
  2. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

    3,811
    5,397
    72
    Wow, Mark -- you're off to an excellent start! Keep the photos coming. It's satisfying to build something that's not produced and is perfectly suited for your railroad.

    I'm an anthracite roads fan too and scratchbuilt this N Scale breaker. It was weathered by a late (and very talented) friend.

    I have no railroad currently, but am making slow progress toward a new one.
    2017-11-14 DS&N Coal Breaker - for upload.jpg
     
    PGE-N°2, JoeTodd, marty coil and 3 others like this.
  3. WM183

    WM183 TrainBoard Member

    581
    508
    14
    You Anthracite road modellers get all the fun! Seriously, great looking builds, both of you!
     
    Hardcoaler likes this.
  4. JimJ

    JimJ Staff Member

    1,273
    1,165
    30
    Very nice scratchbuilding project. Get ‘er done so we can see the finished product. Weathering can make a model come to life.
     
    Hardcoaler likes this.
  5. BNSF FAN

    BNSF FAN TrainBoard Supporter

    4,599
    2,424
    91
    Nice work Mark! (y)
     
    Hardcoaler likes this.
  6. Mark Smith

    Mark Smith TrainBoard Member

    306
    9
    16
    Thanks all. Doubt I'll tackle anything like your coal breaker, Hardcoaler.
    [​IMG]

    Above is a 1950's distant view of the coal shed, which also doubled as a shed for other materials.
    [​IMG]
    Here, in a much earlier photo is the front of the shed where you can see doors and windows as well as the area that goes back to the coal dump area. No idea what they stored behind the doors, but there was a lot of room there. That front wall is between 8 and 9 feet high.
    [​IMG]
    This is an aerial view from my time period. The clapboard office has been replaced by a brick one. The entire coal shed is about 84 feet long. I don't have that much room, so mine is half that size. As you can see cars could be delivered to the far side of the shed for unloading. The photo catches one car actively being unloaded with lumber.

    The front section of the shed (with the larger roof) still remains. The tracks are all gone, but the lumberyard is still holding on.
     
    JoeTodd, Kurt Moose and Hardcoaler like this.
  7. rockislandfan

    rockislandfan New Member

    5
    0
    1
    That looks great! thanks for posting
     
  8. bremner

    bremner Staff Member

    4,867
    2,265
    78
    That's a really good start
     
    JoeTodd likes this.

Share This Page