First Diesel??

Sumner Apr 10, 2019

  1. brokemoto

    brokemoto TrainBoard Member

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    The Kato RSC-2, unlike the prototype, has all six axles geared. The prototype was, of course, A-1-A, but the model is C-C. What is even more laughable is that the Atlas RSD-4 is geared B-1/1-B. The prototype, was, of course, geared C-C. The Kato has pretty good pulling power. The Atlas is anemic, although in pairs, it is good as a pair.

    I had a bunch of Kato RSC-2s, at one point. I liked them. I still have two left.

    I also like the Kato RS-2 and Atlas RS-3.

    I would stay away from the very old issue RSC-2 that Atlas sold that was made by Mehano. It has only one truck powered. I had one that could not even get out of its own way.

    The old Atlas/Katos are quite finicky and will show you the dead spots. I run an older issue B-mann or MP to show up track flaws. If your trackwork has a flaw, an old B-mann or MP will find it quickly. You can get them at shows from a realistic vendor for about ten dollars.
     
  2. Tony Burzio

    Tony Burzio TrainBoard Supporter

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    Hand laying basics:

    Solder is a glue. Anything not between the rail and the tie does nothing, except break off. Use solid paste flux on the inside of the rail, then solder on the outside. The flux will boil off and draw the solder under the rail. Stop when you see a bit of solder appear on the PC board inside where the flux used to be. DO NOT handle the PC ties with your hands, or clean the surface with acetone (read the warnings on the can) before soldering, grease is an effective solder mask.
     
  3. bill pearce

    bill pearce TrainBoard Member

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    I think the TIG, MIG and arc welder I have might be a tad large ;).
    Well, I guess you could give them a try...

    Where can I find the magazine article that you wrote. I'd be really interested in reading it. Thanks,

    I can tell you the magazine but not where to find it. It's in RailModel Journal, Sept. 2001. Time to hit the swapmeets and estate sales.

    It only lightly addresses making one-piece yard ladders, but once you have made a few single turnouts, figuring how to make multiples will be easy. And you can't imagine how smooth a #12 crossover can be.
     
  4. bill pearce

    bill pearce TrainBoard Member

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    Did your friend use the tweezer tool? There's a significant difference in that from a pencil iron. I tinned the underside of my rail, and put a dot of paste flux on the ties. Then I took the rail with the tweezers, placed it in place, held it down, and taped the footswitch and watched the magic. If you are vaporising ties you either have the solderer turned up too high, or are holding the footswitch down too long. The tweezers can also be used to adjust spots where the gauge is off. The biggest advantage aside from not needing three hands is the fact that only the least amount of heat that gets the job done is applied for a very short time. How long do you hold a pencil iron on the rail? With resistance soldering heat is applied for just a bit over one second.
     
  5. MRLdave

    MRLdave TrainBoard Member

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    Back to your original question about the RSC2.........unless I missed something Atlas never sold an RSC2. They did sell an RS3 that was a Kato loco, but it's a whole different animal. Kato also made an RS2 which is a 4 axle loco. As long as you stick to the Kato locos you'll have no problems. The Kato loco will take a DCC decoder without splitting the frame.........it's one of the easier conversions. Also, you can swap between the 2 and 3 axle trucks. I model Milwaukee Road, and they swapped trucks back and forth on their RS/RSC2s and I've converted one of my RSCs to an RS. And although the proto locos were A1A, the model has all 3 axles powered. They are good running locos, but they are a little light, so aren't a strong pulling engine.
     
  6. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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  7. Sumner

    Sumner TrainBoard Member

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    Here is where I found the RSC-2, sold since I saw it.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/N-KATO-176...m43663.l44720&nordt=true&rt=nc&orig_cvip=true

    Then I found the following which suggested that it might be DCC capable...

    http://www.trovestar.com/generic/zoom.php?id=145308

    At the moment after the suggestions here I'm thinking the SD40-2 might be my choice for a 6 truck loco. It is almost as long as the older passenger diesels. There is something about the looks that I really like. Mainly the nose and how it sets back. Looks like I might find it from either Broadway Limited or Kato. Any comment on either or something else?

    For a small loco I'm looking at maybe a GE 44 Tonner. Any thoughts?

    The comments here have really helped my focus more on my options,

    Sumner
     
  8. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Bachmann? I have several. Use their chassis for my HOn30 ventures. They are very good.
     
    Sumner likes this.
  9. RBrodzinsky

    RBrodzinsky Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    For a "first", go with a Kato. BLI locos are a bit problematic, although very nicely detailed. Make sure to check out our TrainBoard advertisers. There are some good deals with them.
     
  10. randgust

    randgust TrainBoard Member

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    I'm a big fan of that Kato RSC2, it's available in UP. Dead quiet, smooth, pulls well... hard not to love. Not sure about DCC issues but bluntly, I didn't care.

    I put that chassis under my MRS1 conversion and really came to love it.

    I have nothing good to say about the similar Atlas RSD versions, too light to be useful, the only one I had I sold.

    I'd never get an Atlas classic chassis again without testing it first as some are dead quiet and some sound like electric razors. The newer runs with the improved universals are much, much quieter, and with the slow-speed motor, really worth it to search them out.

    Beware the original "Atlas GP7" you'll find on a lot of auction sites; the first ones out there were Roco in Yugoslavia dating back to the 1970's and have a relatively terrible motor; the second ones were morphed on a Alco switcher frame and are just a visual mess, the third runs were Atlas/Kato GP35's/30's on an excellent Kato chassis, the fourth ones were the China classics, and now they have slow speed motors, DCC chassis, and improved universals. Learn to absolutely love Mark Peterson and this site: http://www.spookshow.net/
    He's the consumer reports of N scale, and there's photos in there of virtually everything so you can try to figure out what in the world you are looking at, where it came from, and if it is a frog or a prince.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2019
    Sumner likes this.
  11. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    I was thinking that a BLI Centipede would also be an exceptional test vehicle. :) (In all seriousness, these are said to be able to work through 9-3/4" Radius curves on Code 55 rail!)

    upload_2019-4-11_16-20-59.png
     
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  12. Sumner

    Sumner TrainBoard Member

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    Yes the detail on the BLI really caught my eye. It pops out. Sounds like most Kato models are well liked so I'll go that way. I'll be sure and check out the advertisers here. Been to Mike's site a number of times and have watched a lot of his videos and we are almost neighbors since he is in New Mexico and I'm in Utah :) (still 500 miles apart though :().

    Thanks guys for the further info on the RSC-2 and the GE 44 Tonner,

    Sumner
     
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  13. brokemoto

    brokemoto TrainBoard Member

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    The B-mann 44 and 70 tonners are good locomotives. The slow speed control is excellent. The one drawback is that their small footprint makes them prone to stalling, even on straight and level. They are also more finicky than usual about dirty track. If I run them in pairs, the stalling problem is almost non-existent.
     
  14. Sumner

    Sumner TrainBoard Member

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    Update:

    I'm taking the advice given above about getting something ordered when you can find it. I ordered a GE 44 Tonner that will be at the boatyard when we finally get there. Still too much wind to make the crossing back to Florida.

    I still really like the SD40-2 and have been looking for those. Found a few older ones on ebay and maybe some new old ones but some of the adds can be confusing. Looks like it has been a couple years since Kato released them. What I have found is the following Kato numbers:

    Kato 176-4705 SD40-2 Road #4205
    Kato 176-4705 SD40-2 Road #4213
    Kato 176-4812 SD40-2 Road #3220
    Kato 176-4813 SD40-2 Road #3242
    Kato 176-4820 SD40-2 Road #2975
    Kato 176-4821 SD40-2 Road #2994

    I can't find good info on when the ones above were released and if I should be looking for one over the other? Any help would be appreciated.

    In looking at those I found out that there are new Intermountain models that are available now for about $150 DCC no sound and $180 with sound. I've looked at a couple YouTube video reviews and they seem fine but wondering how they compare to Kato. The Kato models are in the same price range or about $30 more which wouldn't deter me if that is what I should go with, but confused by the different release dates for the different part numbers I gave above.

    One final dumb question....if you have an engine with sound is it easy to just turn it off when you don't want to hear it?

    Thanks,

    Sumner
     
  15. RBrodzinsky

    RBrodzinsky Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Both the IM and Kato sound SD40-2s use the ESU LokSound Select decoders. They have a sound on/off button (F8). By default, the sound is off. That way, when you press F8, you get the full startup sequence of the loco.
     
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  16. Sumner

    Sumner TrainBoard Member

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    Thanks, I'll have some more dumb questions as I proceed..:(

    Sumner
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2019
  17. DCESharkman

    DCESharkman TrainBoard Member

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    Never too much wind with a sailboat....

    You can not go wrong with Kato SD-40's of any age. They are all great runners.
     
  18. woodchip

    woodchip New Member

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    I’d suggest any of the Atlas GP 7/9 units that are DCC ready. They are great runners although not as smooth as Kato products but Kato hasn’t done much in the GP series. If you see passenger needs they’re also available in the TT variant. Much like the real world they’re the locomotive that can do it all
    Hugh
     
  19. DCESharkman

    DCESharkman TrainBoard Member

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    The Kato locomotives you listed were released

    Kato 176-4705 SD40-2 Road #4205 - January 2000
    Kato 176-4706 SD40-2 Road #4213 - January 2000
    Kato 176-4812 SD40-2 Road #3220 - January 2000
    Kato 176-4813 SD40-2 Road #3242 - January 2000
    Kato 176-4820 SD40-2 Road #2975 - Fall 2013
    Kato 176-4821 SD40-2 Road #2994 - Fall 2013
     
  20. Sumner

    Sumner TrainBoard Member

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    Thanks David. I read from one source (not sure if they are good -- http://www.trovestar.com/generic/zoom.php?id=115837 ) the following.

    ...'DCC Information: (SD40-2) Models produced since 2006 accept the following plug-in decoders (then they list the decoders).

    Also on their site they show the 176-4812 as a 2000 release....

    http://www.trovestar.com/generic/zoom.php?id=115837

    but then in that link where it says there was a 2016 re-release if you click on that it takes you to another page showing the 2016 release...

    http://www.trovestar.com/generic/zoom.php?id=112673

    Both show the same road number of 3220. I want to find a model that either has a decoder or putting one in would just be replacing the light board. If I see any of these listed used on ebay and they have a decoder then I guess I don't have to worry about if a decoder will work since it has one. I'm looking at bidding on one now that says it has the decoder.

    Others on ebay will say they are used or new but no mention of if it is DCC ready or not and don't tell you it it is a 2000 year release or the 2013 or 2016 year releases. How do I find out? Try and contact the seller?

    I know that decoders can be fitted to earlier models but at this point in my early re-entry into model RR I would like to put that off unless it is fairly simple job.

    Thanks for the help on this,

    Sumner
     

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