big gauge track help!

E. T. Aug 15, 2020

  1. E. T.

    E. T. TrainBoard Member

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    l have acquired some track and l have no idea what gauge it is, or what scale would use it! it's three rail and 2" - 2 1/8" between rails [depending upon if you pinch the rails together or stretch them out...] What the heck is it?
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2020
  2. Keith

    Keith TrainBoard Supporter

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    Sounds like the old standard gauge stuff!
    Stuff like American Flyer, Ives, Lionel(I think) and others.
    Old AC powered trains! A friend of mine used to have it.
    About 1/4 inch wider than the standard G Scale track!
     
  3. E. T.

    E. T. TrainBoard Member

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    hmmm, l have a lot of pre-war and post war trains from many makers, but have never encountered this...
     
  4. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Could you post a picture or two?
     
  5. E. T.

    E. T. TrainBoard Member

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    Looks exactly like older Lionel 0 gauge 3 rail, same rails, same pins, and same ties...just bigger, but, it does have MTH stamped on the ties.
     
  6. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    MTH is MTH Electric Trains. "MTH" are the initials of the business' original name "Mike's Train House". They are a manufacturer and owner of numerous brand names. Unfortunately they'll be shutting down next year, unless someone steps up and buys them...

    You can find their web site easily, via Google.
     
  7. E. T.

    E. T. TrainBoard Member

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    After a little digging...Standard Gauge, also known as wide gauge, was an early model railway and toy train rail gauge, introduced in the United States in 1906 by Lionel Corporation.[1] As it was a toy standard, rather than a scale modeling standard, the actual scale of Standard Gauge locomotives and rolling stock varied. It ran on three-rail track whose running rails were 2 1⁄8 in (53.975 mm) apart. l guess all the manufactures gave it up by the early 1940's. lf you would like to read more about it [as in the whys and the competition] here is a link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_Gauge_(toy_trains) Funny l have never ran across this track before... lt's rather pricey now too, comparable to brass G! lt's in good shape if anyone can use it.
     
  8. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    I am quite familiar with Standard Gauge. (Past member, TCA. Former collector, repairer, seller...) Actually that track size is still available. As I noted, MTH for one present day manufacturer. Yes, it is pricey. (Be careful when citing Wikipedia. It is not always an adequate resource.) Standard Gauge is a niche market, but still very much alive!
     
  9. E. T.

    E. T. TrainBoard Member

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    Yes, MTH is where l more or less established it is "standard," and Wikipedia is where l got the dimension and a little history. No, l don't rely on Wikipedia, as l realize it can be posted by anyone...just a reference. THANKS ALL F0R THE HELP!
     

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