Are Wiking Cement Trucks Suitable for Late 1970s Layout?

Kisatchie Jun 18, 2022

  1. Kisatchie

    Kisatchie TrainBoard Member

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  2. acptulsa

    acptulsa TrainBoard Member

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    Probably. But those particular trucks were unheard of in the U.S. I'm not sure they met U.S. regulations. Indeed, cab-forwards were and are decidedly unpopular for mixer work on these shores.
     
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  3. Kisatchie

    Kisatchie TrainBoard Member

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    Thanks, acptulsa.

    The search for cement trucks goes on...
     
  4. John Moore

    John Moore TrainBoard Supporter

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    GHQ may be too modern. But the Classic Metal works are 1960s truck and they could have a long life in service.
     
  5. MRLdave

    MRLdave TrainBoard Member

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    CMW trucks are 1954 so 1970s might be stretching it a bit far.
     
  6. John Moore

    John Moore TrainBoard Supporter

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  7. Kisatchie

    Kisatchie TrainBoard Member

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  8. mtntrainman

    mtntrainman TrainBoard Supporter

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  9. Kisatchie

    Kisatchie TrainBoard Member

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    Thanks, but I can't handle all the small parts of a kit.
     
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  10. mtntrainman

    mtntrainman TrainBoard Supporter

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    Mine is sitting under the mixer at the batch plant...
    [​IMG]

    You have to look pretty hard to see mine isn't finished either..:LOL:
     
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  11. tehachapifan

    tehachapifan TrainBoard Member

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    Hard to beat the Athearn offering(s).... if you can find one.
     
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  12. cfritschle

    cfritschle TrainBoard Member

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    The prototype Ford L-9000 series trucks that the GHQ model is based on was introduced in 1970, so yes they were around in the late 1970s. The Wiking trucks are all based on European prototypes, with only the Mercedes trucks having ever been marketed in North America, which was by Freightliner in the 1980s.

    However, if you don't want to build the GHQ kit, you can kitbash the Wiking mixer onto an Altlas LNT-9000 chassis. (The Atlas model is "advertised" as a 1984 Ford LNT-9000, but it matches the 1972-84 Ford L Series trucks with the bright grille trim that were introduced in 1972.)

    [​IMG]

    The Wiking mixer does not have much for detail, but I still think it does look a little better than the CMW mixer.

    Carter
     
  13. MRLdave

    MRLdave TrainBoard Member

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    What scale are you looking for.......the original post was for an N scale Wiking? The CMW John posted is HO and it IS a 1960, but the n scale ones are 1954. As Carter said, you might be able to bash either CMW or Wiking mixer onto an Atlas chassis.
     
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  14. Kisatchie

    Kisatchie TrainBoard Member

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    I need N scale. I thought the HO scale info applied to N scale. My mistake...

    I doubt if I could bash a CMW or Hiking mixer onto an Atlas chassis. My bashing days are over:(.
     
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  15. bman

    bman TrainBoard Member

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    Even though it's a 1954 model the N scale Classic Metals mixer could work for the late 1970's. I ran a ready mix plant in the mid 1990's. Along with a dozen Ford 9000's from the 70's and 80's my facilty rostered an old White Contruktor from the 1960's that was older than the employee who drove it. We had a few plants out in rural Ohio using "vintage" trucks as well. I have seen photos of Freightliner cabover mixers but they have had dual steering axles. These were on Hank's Truck Pictures when was still up on the web. I think they were taken in the pacific northwest and/or British Columbia. It's been a few years I could be wrong. Of course a B or R model Mack from Athearn would work as well if you can find one.
     
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  16. cfritschle

    cfritschle TrainBoard Member

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    One of the problems with using the CMW IH R-190 for a mixer truck is that it really doesn't look "robust" enough for the load requirements. One spec sheet I found showed the R-190 GVW limit was only 30,000 lbs.

    And while IH considered the R-190 a "heavy duty" truck, the wheels CMW uses on them are significantly smaller than what you would expect on a Class 8 truck. IH produced the V-series trucks from 1956-67 that were heavier than the R-series, and those trucks were designed for heavy duty construction work.

    Carter
     
  17. rockysgn

    rockysgn TrainBoard Member

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    I have two Athearn cement trucks they look really good. Yes they are hard to find but might be worth looking around for some I believe they are Mack trucks.
    Larry
     
  18. Kisatchie

    Kisatchie TrainBoard Member

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    I found an Athearn cement truck on ebay and it was $49.95. No chance I'll spend that much LOL.
     
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  19. cfritschle

    cfritschle TrainBoard Member

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    The Athearn mixers are indeed Macks. The Model R concrete mixer won the New N Scale Vehicle of the Year Award in 2007. https://nscalevehicles.org/vehicle_of_year/2007.php

    And the Athearn Model B concrete mixer won the Enhanced N Scale Vehicle of the Year Award in 2008. https://nscalevehicles.org/vehicle_of_year/2008.php

    It's too bad Athearn sold the tooling for the Mack trucks to a company that appears to have no interest in releasing N scale models. :(

    Carter
     
  20. Rich_S

    Rich_S TrainBoard Member

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    Hi Kiz, As someone who spent a few years driving concrete mixers,

    Yes this was one of the mixers I drove.
    Riverside Mixer.jpg

    I can tell you the Walthers kit is not a batch plant it's a cement storage and distribution silos.

    PC SD9 Switching Medusa Cement.jpg

    This is what the batch plant looks like at the company where I worked.
    Riverside Batch Plant.jpg
    One truck at a time would fit under the Silo for loading.
    Riverside Batch Plant loading Truck 40.jpg

    Now for anyone who is confused. Cement is the glue that holds concrete together. Cement is made primary from limestone and is transported to Concrete batch plants in powder form. At the Batch Plant the Cement is mixed with Sand and Gravel. When the truck arrives onsite, water is added to the mixture while the drum spins. When them mixture is ready, the driver spins the drum in the opposite direction to discharge the Concrete.

    So long story short, for your Medusa Cement plant, you don't need any mixers just some 2 bay covered hoppers :)
     
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