1. okane

    okane TrainBoard Supporter

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    What you see in the picture below is one of a number of train-related items I inherited back in 2008 after my father passed away. It's a Badger Air Compressor Model 80-2, air hose and a Badger Paintbrush. The compressor works and is blowing a decent flow of compressed air.

    So as a newbie to paint brushing, where should I start, is this a decent setup for someone begin with. I would bet this has not been run since 2006 the year Dad passed. So what should I be looking for to confirm operations?

    IMG_20210113_171632.jpg
     
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  2. SP-Wolf

    SP-Wolf TrainBoard Supporter

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  3. locomcf

    locomcf TrainBoard Member

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    There are many videos on the care and use of airbrushes on YouTube, and I recommend that you watch some of them. This one briefly discusses your airbrush at the 4:40 mark.
     
  4. okane

    okane TrainBoard Supporter

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    @SP-Wolf and @locomcf - Thank you I shall take a gander at these in the next couple of days.
     
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  5. Massey

    Massey TrainBoard Member

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    So this is a very basic air brush. Basically point push the button and spray. The air control is through the regulator, and the flow control is from the position of the nozzle in the air stream. This is called a single action air brush. It’s good for doing work that doesn’t require fine detail. Cleaning and maintenance is really easy as there isn’t much to clean up, no needle or packing to worry about.

    Try to remember to be moving before you push the button to prevent a hard spot in your spray.

    So this type of airbrush is different from a dual (or double) action where you have the paint entering the body of the brush and passing through a tapered needle that can regulate the flow of paint. This also gives you a finer control of the pattern and usually a finer spray. The drawback is the double action is more difficult to use. It is called dual action because the button has 2 positions. The first is push down for air flow then pull back for paint flow.

    I have 2 air brushes, my first one was a Paache VL. It’s a double action brush that has a rather large nozzle, and I got a variety of needles and tips with it. I found it good for spraying model car and Star Trek ship models, but it didn’t work too well for detailing. My next brush was an Iwata Eclipse HB-BCS which has a much finer nozzle and a better spray. For the price I paid it should be better than the Paache, but I use them both. They also both use the same bottles, and the same hoses. Your brush would also use the same bottles.

    I say your badger will provide you a good long service, just keep it clean and dry.
     
  6. locomcf

    locomcf TrainBoard Member

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    I've been using a Badger like that for more than 30 years to paint rolling stock, locos and structures, and it has never let me down. I also own an expensive dual-action airbrush, but (as you say) it is a little more difficult to use. I have little need for fine detailing, so for MY purposes, the Badger is easier to use and clean, and does just as good a job.
     
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  7. Jim Reising

    Jim Reising TrainBoard Member

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    I am not a big airbrush user - but what you have is basically what I have. I added a regulator/moisture trap, and perhaps most important (to me anyway) a surge tank. It works for me.
     
  8. okane

    okane TrainBoard Supporter

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  9. Massey

    Massey TrainBoard Member

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    That would work just fine. You may need adapters to mate to your compressor, but that is not uncommon.
     
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  10. okane

    okane TrainBoard Supporter

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    Gents, Thank you so much. Now to start sorting through all the HO Rolling Stock and Locos, tie to think about selling!
     
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