MTL Station Kit # 799 90 906...

strummer Oct 12, 2017

  1. strummer

    strummer TrainBoard Member

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    Am (finally) ready to begin construction of this SP-styled structure, and I have a couple of questions.

    1. Although the directions say to assemble the walls together, THEN install all the trim pieces, isn't it always better to do the opposite? Attach the windows, doors, trim, etc., then assemble those "completed" pieces together?

    Now for the biggie...

    2. The window sashes are peel and stick, but what does the sticky side attach to if, as per the instructions, they are attached from the inside? What holds all these pieces in place? Not likely it's the window glazing, as those pieces look to be cut to the same size as the sashes...The "trim" pieces (which are to be fitted to the outside of the walls) have the walls proper to attach to, but those sashes...(?)

    Mark in Oregon
     
  2. strummer

    strummer TrainBoard Member

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    ...never mind, I figured it out! :confused:

    Mark in Oregon
     
  3. SJ Z-man

    SJ Z-man TrainBoard Supporter

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    Good, I don't have to stop by Robert Ray (designer and producer of the kit, way back when).
     
  4. markm

    markm TrainBoard Supporter

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    Mark,
    I think nearly all the kits describe the construction as if they were prototypes. I painted and assembled much of the details before erecting them. I also added strip wood in the corners for additional support and to support a floor between the station and living quarters. I found tricky part is getting the 1st floor roof on around the second floor. You don't wait to do the window frames on the second floor until you get it in place.

    Mark
     
  5. strummer

    strummer TrainBoard Member

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    Thank you Mark

    What threw me off was that the trim attaches to the outside (of course) but those pieces need to be centered to allow for enough of their sticky backing to then hold the window sashes in place. So you must attach to the outside, while looking at it from the inside!

    Once I figured that out, it's going pretty well, I think. Makes into what appears to be a nice structure.

    Mark in Oregon
     
  6. shamoo737

    shamoo737 Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Robert Ray’s kits are always well thought out. He is a designer, builder, and a z scale modeler.
     
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  7. strummer

    strummer TrainBoard Member

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    I've heard that name before, somewhere...

    I thought assembling the roof would be difficult, what with all those odd angles and the like, but it went together very nicely. Will post a picture when it's finished.

    Mark in Oregon
     
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  8. strummer

    strummer TrainBoard Member

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    ...and here it is:

    IMG_20171018_143607717.jpg

    I opted to paint the sashes the same brown as the trim; I felt that painting them white ( as per the instructions) would make them appear bulky and out of scale. Still have to assemble and attach the chimney, and build a "proper" base.

    I really liked building this kit; everything was cut cleanly, and fit as it was supposed to.

    Mark in Oregon
     
  9. markm

    markm TrainBoard Supporter

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    Mark,
    SP had many variations of paint schemes depending on the era, location and style of the station. The instructions are just one version. Note that the sashes weren't always white: http://nilesdepot.org/niles/photos_restored.html

    Depending on the location and era of your station, you may not want to use the chimney, rather replacing it with a stove pipe. SP had severe damage to many of it's brick chimneys in the 1906 earthquake and replaced them with pipes.

    You still need station signage on the passenger side roof, like the header on the Niles Depot site. Also don't forget that typical accessory of SP stations: the palm tree.

    Nicely done,
    Mark
     
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  10. mdvholland

    mdvholland TrainBoard Member

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    Thanks for posting, Mark. I have been considering to get this kit recently. Could you maybe upload a few detailed pictures? I wonder if the roof and walls are printed or lasered? And what does the back look like?

    It is a close representation, I think, of a VERR depot in Lemon Cove, CA. Except that it seemed to be mirrored..?

    Matt
    [​IMG]
     
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  11. markm

    markm TrainBoard Supporter

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    Matt,

    Another Mark here. Yes they are. They are both SP type 22 combination stations. The documentation I have suggests they are mirror images.

    Test fitting another model I have in-process on my bench, it's appears the base could be flipped over and the station assembled in a mirror image. You would lose the siding detail on the broad sides and the wall between the station and freight house, also the detail on the 1st floor roof.

    Hope this helps,

    Mark
     
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  12. mdvholland

    mdvholland TrainBoard Member

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    Sure does, thanks. Still would appreciate detail pictures of the kit and/or built model, from either Mark :rolleyes:

    Matt
     
  13. strummer

    strummer TrainBoard Member

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    Here's the "back" side...

    IMG_20171019_084233495.jpg

    Hope that helps...

    Mark (the one) in Oregon :)
     
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  14. markm

    markm TrainBoard Supporter

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    Here's some of the construction details (and a quarter for scale):
    DSCF0794-1.jpg

    Here's what you get when you mirror the side pieces:
    station.jpg

    With a straightedge and knife you could scribe the planking in the back side. The roof is wood covered with a shingle paper. The shingle paper can't be mirrored and you'd have to go to a third party material.

    And if Joe is listening: it's would be nice if the kit had both left and right hand versions. It's just 3 siding pieces and an additional shingle sheet. The European makers of injection structures frequently add "spare" parts to their sprues to make them more universal. Also it isn't all that hard to modify the kit for a short freight shed.

    (another) Mark
     
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  15. mdvholland

    mdvholland TrainBoard Member

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    Thanks, Marks!

    Gottagetmeone...
     
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