1. Kevin Anderson

    Kevin Anderson TrainBoard Member

    1,774
    317
    34
    Ok my layout runs on DCC, however I am working on the turn table. I have DCC to the track but the motor that makes the bridge move I will need to use DC. I plan on using an Bachman DC power pack that I have. I will be running wires from this to a distribution block. (I have an oil pump I want to motorized too). Now my questions.

    What size wire to run from power pack to distribution block?

    What size wire from distribution block to momentary on/off toggle switch?

    How do I wire this toggle switch? It can turn on both ways. I want to use this to control the motor on the turn table.

    Thanks!
     
  2. RBrodzinsky

    RBrodzinsky Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

    4,528
    1,248
    69
    Usually, 16 or 18 awg wires are fine for this type of auxiliary bus. 20 - 24 will be fine for the feeders. Depending on how much the motor draws, using larger (smaller number) may be warranted.

    When you say “it can turn on both ways” do you mean the toggle is a double pole double throw switch? These would have 6 soldering posts on the back, which is what I think you will want, so you can move in both directions. This diagram shows how to wire the switch

    16F9FB1A-A1FB-4198-9809-1CA906D4FAB8.gif
     
    Joe Lovett and Hardcoaler like this.
  3. Kevin Anderson

    Kevin Anderson TrainBoard Member

    1,774
    317
    34
    Awesome thanks. Yes the momentary switch will turn on both ways to move the motor.
     
  4. mikegillow

    mikegillow TrainBoard Supporter

    110
    115
    12
    Depending on the power requirements of your turntable motor, you might also consider using an inexpensive DCC locomotive controller. The turntable becomes a 'loco' that you can control the direction and speed of. We did that on one of our club layout turntables and it was much easier to align the bridge to the surrounding tracks and ease it into place by dialing down the throttle when it got close.
     
    Jimbo20 likes this.
  5. Kevin Anderson

    Kevin Anderson TrainBoard Member

    1,774
    317
    34
    Tried that once didn’t quite work out.
     
  6. Kevin Anderson

    Kevin Anderson TrainBoard Member

    1,774
    317
    34
    Finally getting around to this. Looks like I was using a SPDT switch. Need to find an electronics store close by. Hopefully the local hardware store has some switches and terminal blocks that I can use.
     
  7. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

    2,162
    2,653
    52
  8. Kevin Anderson

    Kevin Anderson TrainBoard Member

    1,774
    317
    34
    Found a switch at a local electronics supply store.

    Now the problem I’m having is weird. I hook up the turntable motor to the accessory port on the DC power pack and all it does is hum. I hook it to the DC terminal for track and the motor works. The motor is a Walthers motorizing kit. Is there something I’m missing here?
     
  9. RBrodzinsky

    RBrodzinsky Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

    4,528
    1,248
    69
    Many accessory ports are AC, not DC. Double check.
     
    Hardcoaler likes this.
  10. Kevin Anderson

    Kevin Anderson TrainBoard Member

    1,774
    317
    34
    Yeah it’s AC. I switched the wires to
    The DC side.

    Now I have a sound chip I was going to attempt to wire in to this. The chip actually has a 9 volt battery terminal on it. Good idea to cut off and wire into this or go a different route?
     
  11. RBrodzinsky

    RBrodzinsky Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

    4,528
    1,248
    69
    Are you locking the DC at 9V? If not, I would at least add a 9V regulator, or even use the AC side with bridge rectifier and 9V regulator. Don't want to fry your sound chip with the wrong voltage.
     
  12. Kevin Anderson

    Kevin Anderson TrainBoard Member

    1,774
    317
    34
    Yeah not sure how I want to do this one. I love adding the sound to my saw mill. But not sure about the 9 V battery it calls for.
     
  13. RBrodzinsky

    RBrodzinsky Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

    4,528
    1,248
    69
    Or, just bring out a 9V battery extender, and add an on/off (simple SPST on one wire), so the battery isn't always on.
     
    Kevin Anderson likes this.

Share This Page