Random Railfan Prototype Photos For All

Hardcoaler Mar 26, 2015

  1. Eagle2

    Eagle2 Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    It looks like there is, to my eyes. Maybe a slightly deeper than normal flange with rubber tire added over the steel wheel?
     
  2. r_i_straw

    r_i_straw Mostly N Scale Staff Member

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    In 1933 the Budd company and Michelin teamed up to build a rail car with pneumatic tires that also had flanges. However the flanges were normally not in contact with the side of the rail head.
     
  3. Mike VE2TRV

    Mike VE2TRV TrainBoard Member

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    That Diesel Shay must have a huge amount of torque - my guess is that they figured they could get the same amount of pulling power out of that bugger as with a steam Shay.

    If that Madagascar unit (Galloping Goose meets Paris Metro?) is built anything like the Paris Metro - or the Montreal Metro which is based on the Paris one - they will have flanged wheels as a backup to the tires in case they go flat or shred.
     
  4. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 HOn30 & N Scales Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    I am curious as to how it rode. Surely smoother than steel on steel. Probably rather quiet. Could sneak up on a person, unless the exhaust was noisy?
     
  5. Mike VE2TRV

    Mike VE2TRV TrainBoard Member

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    The Montreal subway is noticeably quieter than those with steel wheels. Once in a while, especially over switches, you can hear the steel backup wheels contact the rails momentarily. That's definitely a steel-on-steel sound!

    I don't think the Madagascar "goose" can sneak up on anyone. It likely has an unmistakeable putt-putt that alerts everyone to its arrival.;)
     
  6. ddechamp71

    ddechamp71 TrainBoard Member

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    Thank you for the comments guys. Indeed this railcar is named "Micheline", from its inventor and manufacturer Michelin, otherwise known as one of the big tire manufacturers in the world. The Micheline were studied and manufactured just before as well as just after World War II (some were created for normal gauge track but none is currently preserved in operating status).


    To give you some replies: yes, the vehicle's wheels consist of true air inflated tires, that sometimes deflate due to a puncture (the vehicle caries spare wheels under its body, like those you have in your own automobile's bunk). Alongside the tired wheel is a steel disk, slightly taller than the wheel itself, that serves as a flange to the wheel.

    [​IMG]


    I rode this railcar. It's surely the most awesome train trip I had to this day. The trip took place between Antananarivo, Madagascar's capital, to a remote location 100 miles eastwards. The sightseeing was one of the most breathtaking I've ever seen. Leaving central country's plateau, the railroad line then proceeds high in the mountains, far above a lower valley, then slowly descends and runs over itself on a loop looking like famous UP's Tehachapi Loop between Mojave and Bakersfield, and then continues into rugged terrain until the shore and its harbour terminus of Tamatave. Riding this car is very smooth as tires absorb most of track's irregularities.. And the car itself is very comfortable, with broad movable seats that can be arranged to the desired position and orientation... It's made for only 15 passengers or so, so we are far from beeing crammed...


    The only drawback of this Michelin technology is that as rail threads are narrow and as wheels are the same width than those of a medium motorbike, axle load is limited to a mere 1500 kgs (3300 lbs) per axle, so it only fits with light vehicles. A simple 80-ton RDC would need..... Uh, let me count..... Many, many axles! I guess the whole vehicle's length wouldn't be sufficient...


    As of Paris or Montréal Underground, the system is completely different: tires are broad, like a truck's, and ride on a special track that is completely different of a normal railroad. Furthermore guidance is completed with small wheels that are horizontally positionned, and that run in contact of raised lateral track just above the running track itself. On the opposite, Michelin's railcars run on standard railroads they share with standard steel wheeled trains...


    Dom
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Hytec

    Hytec TrainBoard Member

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    Dom, thank you for this interesting write-up. I remember the few times that I rode the Michelin tired Paris Metro as extremely comfortable and virtually noise free, with the exception of motor noise. The major difference I remember of that line versus a standard steel rail line was that the tires rode on a wooden platform approximately 1/2 meter wide with a steel guide rail at the outside of the wooden platform, as you described. The guide tires are visible in this photo just ahead of the support tires.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. ddechamp71

    ddechamp71 TrainBoard Member

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    Hytech, are you sure that the platform the subway's wheels ride on is made of wood? Sounds puzzling. ;) (Anyway, I'm not fond enough of public municipal transportation to search information for that ;) )

    Dom
     
  9. r_i_straw

    r_i_straw Mostly N Scale Staff Member

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    The elevated trains between terminals at the airport in Houston uses rubber tired vehicles on special guideways. The underground train there has rails.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Hytec

    Hytec TrainBoard Member

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    My memory is from 1970-71, so may have fogged over 45 years. However, the platform appeared to be constructed of laminated wooden strips, or a material that closely resembled wood with a longitudinal grain pattern and color shades that varied with each strip.

    Interestingly, the platform in the photo I posted does not resemble what I remember. The photo platform appears to be a more uniform material as if manufactured or extruded in a continuous process.
     
  11. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 HOn30 & N Scales Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    So at least one does still survive?

    Interesting looking tire tread. If only modern rail cars were so fascinating!
     
  12. ddechamp71

    ddechamp71 TrainBoard Member

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    I guess there's at least one sitting silent in Mulhouse's national railroad museum (Mulhouse is located east of France very close to Swiss boundary). Never been there yet...

    Dom
     
  13. Mike VE2TRV

    Mike VE2TRV TrainBoard Member

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    The Montreal Metro (see Hytec's photo - that's the one!) rides on concrete runways with steel guide rails on each side. There is a standard gauge track between the runways that serves as the backup in case of tire failure.

    Another interesting bit of trivia - the excavated material from the tunnels was used to build up the islands in the St Lawrence for the 1967 Universal Exposition (which I vaguely remember visiting with my folks back then, and plenty of slides to help my memory along!).
     
  14. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    Saw this interesting derail at Murphy Jct., NC where the Canton, NC branch joins the Asheville, NC <=> Knoxville, TN mainline. The branch approaches the mainline on a significant downgrade, so no simple derail is this. Instead, it's a turnout with no frog and it'll definitely put a stop to an errant movement. It's motorized, and interlocked with the signals no doubt.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. r_i_straw

    r_i_straw Mostly N Scale Staff Member

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    [​IMG]
    Random it is.
     
  16. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 HOn30 & N Scales Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    I wonder what sort of grade approaches that derail? If significant, there'd surely be cars scattering. Might even get over to impact the main track.
     
  17. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    You're right -- it'd tip the car or locomotive and create quite a mess. I guess the outcome would likely be worse if equipment entered the main. It'd transit the long bridge over the French Broad River and into Asheville Yard where an even larger derailment could occur.

    I recall reading about a terrible wreck on the CNJ in the late '50s where a commuter train hit derails at the open Newark Bay drawbridge, but its momentum carried the train forward and into the void. Locomotives and cars fell into the river with great loss of life. I think investigators determined the Engineman suffered a heart attack and the Fireman was not able to react in time to stop the train.
     
  18. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    Waynesboro, VA

    It's July 2008 and an NS coal train is making its way under the former C&O at Waynesboro, VA:

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Mike VE2TRV

    Mike VE2TRV TrainBoard Member

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    Random, it certainly is. Prototype, I'm not too sure. This was out in the parking lot at Ottawa Train Expo today:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I know for sure that this is no comfort cab! ;)
     
  20. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    Cute! Someone at CN has ample imagination. It looks great!
     

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