ATSF Old photos

r_i_straw Oct 20, 2022

  1. Kurt Moose

    Kurt Moose TrainBoard Member

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  2. acptulsa

    acptulsa TrainBoard Member

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  3. acptulsa

    acptulsa TrainBoard Member

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  4. acptulsa

    acptulsa TrainBoard Member

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  5. acptulsa

    acptulsa TrainBoard Member

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  6. Des Moines Rocket

    Des Moines Rocket TrainBoard Member

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    Nice picture of the truncated (I assume near the end of the service) Super C! I remember reading an article in Trains (I think) magazine about that service years ago. I'll have to find it again. It started out strong, but I believe the fact that the New York Central didn't fully buy in, among other reasons, doomed it. I could be misremembering, of course, which is why I have to go back and read the article again.
     
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  7. acptulsa

    acptulsa TrainBoard Member

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    No, that was very early days, before it had much of a chance to catch on.

    4197 was the only one of the seven mallet hinge Berkshires bought from B&M second hand during the war that the Santa Fe put some effort into standardizing. They managed to improve her tractive effort from 61,000 to 70,000 pounds, which still didn't compare to the 83,000 of their own Baldwins of the 4101 Class, but was good enough that she outlived the others by five years. She went to scrap with most of the 4101s in '54. I don't know of any other Limas on the Santa Fe roster.

    [​IMG]

    The 4101 boilers held 275 psi, though it was several years before they installed popoff valves that would hold that much. Their 300 psi Northerns also produced well over 80,000 pounds of starting tractive effort. Not many railroads got that much out of four driving axle power.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2023 at 3:35 AM
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  8. acptulsa

    acptulsa TrainBoard Member

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    The end of the Chisholm Trail.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. mmi16

    mmi16 TrainBoard Member

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    As pictured it is not a moneymaker!
     
  10. acptulsa

    acptulsa TrainBoard Member

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    [​IMG]

    She was the first 2-10-4. The road didn't think to name the wheel arrangement; after all, she was just one of a large class of Santa Fe types. They were kind of blasé about extra trailing axles; their 4-8-4s were initially "Heavy Mountain" types. When the Texas & Pacific bought Berkshire-like, Mallet-hinged 2-10-4s from Lima a few years later, the type became known as the Texas type. And the Santa Fe, along with its subsidiaries the Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe based in Galveston, and Panhandle and Santa Fe based in Amarillo (among other roads in the Lone Star State), agreed that it was the perfect name for the type, and just what they'd have called it if they had thought to call it anything.

    Among her "betterments" in the years before this pic was snapped was Universal disc main drivers.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2023 at 4:42 AM
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  11. r_i_straw

    r_i_straw Mostly N Scale Staff Member

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    These shots were taken by Victor B. D'Agostino in 1963 at Redondo in Los Angeles.
    Victor B. D'Agostino63Redondo.jpg 326789033_1400654424075952_4438684206231761725_n.jpg
     
  12. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 HOn30 & N Scales Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Conversions from old box cars?
     
  13. acptulsa

    acptulsa TrainBoard Member

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    Not according to what little I can find out; they were purpose built in the early twenties. But I'd be surprised if the road didn't reuse bits from old cars, like those archbar trucks. The road favored side door cabooses for branch line work. They were mainly found on mixed trains that didn't have enough passenger, express and mail traffic to justify a full-sized combine.
     
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  14. Mike C

    Mike C TrainBoard Member

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    I have never heard of a Mallet hinged loco . What makes it so ? I see no obvious signs that this loco is anything other than a regular 2-10-4 although there is an odd looking drive cylinder on the firemans side .
     
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  15. acptulsa

    acptulsa TrainBoard Member

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    I don't know how to explain the valve. But I said it was the T&P that bought Texas types with hinged frames. The Santa Fe did not. 3829 in particular was built before that fad started.

    You know articulated locomotives had big swivels in their frames, that's what made them articulated. They were called Mallet hinges. Well certain superpower engines like 4197 above in post 467 above had those hinges, too. The trailing truck was an articulated section of the frame, with the drawbar pocket built into the back. This allowed it to carry a much larger ash pan, which didn't have to be cleaned out as often.

    The Santa Fe never went in for that, because it took weight off the driving wheels, reducing tractive effort. They also had some trouble backing through switches. Besides, in the end the Santa Fe converted all their remaining steam to oil fuel (the ones that hadn't been oil burners since they were built), making the oversized ash pan unnecessary. But it was a major feature of the Lima Superpower Revolution of the late twenties, and the Santa Fe's 4101 Class were among the few 2-8-4 types that lacked the feature.

    Go down to Palestine, Texas and look under T&P 610 some time.

    [​IMG]

    Or click here to get some idea of it:
    https://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=68425
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2023 at 1:28 AM
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  16. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    I recollect something like that too, along with loss of a U.S. Mail contract. The Super C meant high rates and the Santa Fe learned that not all shippers were willing to pay for expedited delivery. Sometime later, the Santa Fe studied the speed at which TOFC trailers were picked up at terminals after arrival and confirmed that tiered pricing was wise. Some trailers were quickly picked up, while others would sit for a day or two. Matching rates to service earned better revenue, controlled costs and pleased shippers too.
     
  17. acptulsa

    acptulsa TrainBoard Member

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  18. acptulsa

    acptulsa TrainBoard Member

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    A tandem compound leaking steam, 1920.

    [​IMG]
     
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  19. r_i_straw

    r_i_straw Mostly N Scale Staff Member

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    Looking out from Mission Tower, Los Angeles in 1964. Victor B. D'Agostino Photo.
    327454220_1538516173291713_3759515007775904014_n.jpg
     
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  20. Kurt Moose

    Kurt Moose TrainBoard Member

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    If I saw this on a layout, I'd say "that's not prototypical!!"

    Oh, you have a pic...:censored:
     
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