Layout Table legs - cushioning

Kitbash Feb 24, 2016

  1. Kitbash

    Kitbash TrainBoard Supporter

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    At long last I am having my finished attic inspected this Friday. "Assuming" I pass inspection, Saturday I will be purchasing enough lumber to start the layout table. Been a loooooong time coming.

    Layout legs: I plan on using 2x3's (1 1/2" x 2 1/2") as I have done on my previous 2 Albemarle Division layouts. This layout will be on hardwood flooring. So, question: Has anyone seen rubber caps or pads made for 2x lumber? I really don't need to do the tee-nut, leg leveling thing. I've had those on my last 2 layouts and never had to adjust, ever, when the layouts were done. I really don't want to use the furniture leg cups, I'd rather use something that cushions and is more permanent. I really don't want gouge the floor.

    I'd thought about cutting and gluing furniture sliders to the bottom of the legs, but that seems "cheesy". But may be a good answer.

    Any thoughts? Experience with layouts on hardwood?

    Thanks
     
  2. Shortround

    Shortround TrainBoard Member

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    The slider things were my first thought. I don't know of anything for 2x4s but maybe you should check out places that sell the hardwood flooring. Maybe get something for 1" x 3" hardwood legs, get some 1" x 3" hard wood and cut some pads the attach to the ends of the 2x3s and mount the pads to those little stubs.
    Understand what I mean?
     
  3. SackOHammers

    SackOHammers TrainBoard Member

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    Casters. Rubber wheels. Allow mobility. Inexpensive. You can lock the wheels.
     
  4. mikegillow

    mikegillow TrainBoard Member

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    The only issue you should have with a wooden leg in direct contact with a hardwood floor is if the leg slides back and forth. If it is in a fixed position and not moving it should do no damage (unless the flooring surface is not fully cured before leg installation). If you are concerned about it you can get stick-on felt buttons designed for chair legs, or the nail-on chair feet (either felt or the 'slider' plastic). Or you could do something as simple as cut small squares out of an old t-shirt and attach them with a small amount of glue or double-sided tape.
     
  5. Jeepy84

    Jeepy84 TrainBoard Member

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    Depending where you live, your floor will expand and contract with the seasons. Oak is especially vulnerable to this, but so are maple and poplar. So, you will definitely want some sort of padding unless you live in the desert or can live with the minute scratching that will assuredly occur. Even free-standing furniture "moves". I would suggest the small self-adhesive felt buttons, they'll get the job done while being inconspicuous. If you really want to get involved, you can drill shallow countersink holes for them to fit in. I did that on a entryway table I made for my parents that was stained ebony and finished in tung oil. Didn't want floor protectors detracting from its appearance on their glossy floor.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
     
  6. Kitbash

    Kitbash TrainBoard Supporter

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    Yeah. After thinking about it, the felt pads seem like the best idea. I know some home centers have the thicker version of the felt leg pads for custom cutting. I could just pre-cut a bunch of 1 1/2" x 2 1/2" pieces and glue them on the bottoms. I was making this more complicated than necessary and trying to think of something "dressier" like a premade rubber cup, something like you'd see on metal tubing legs. But, I'm ready to move along w/ the layout and the felt seems like the most painless, yet effective.
     
    Jeepy84 likes this.
  7. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 HOn30 & N Scales Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    With the passage of time and the weight which might be upon them, probably anything you try will still eventually leave a mark on your flooring. I'd just go with the felt idea. Get a nice, thick piece which covers the entire leg bottom, and get 'em built.
     
  8. Dave Hughes

    Dave Hughes TrainBoard Member

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    I agree with SackoHammers. I put casters on my legs. It is working out great, allows me to pull layout away from the wall to work along the back.
     
  9. SackOHammers

    SackOHammers TrainBoard Member

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    I've had casters on my 5x10 foot table for 7 years and I'm glad I went that route. Makes it easy to move around. And I don't worry about marks on the floor.
    You drill a hole in the bottom of your legs, pound some T Nuts into the holes. Then you use stem casters and screw them down into the T nuts. Alternatively, you can use lag bolts and screw them right into your legs. This will provide a better hold, especially when going into the end grain of a wooden leg.
    They'll recommend you use "hollow king pin" stem casters. Then you go to your hardware store and get the lag bolts for your stems. Make two of your casters the locking type so your layout holds into position when desired.
    http://www.castercity.com/cmK3a-stem.htm
    http://www.castercity.com/tips/hollow-kingpin.htm

    Send those guys at caster city an email (include a picture if you want). Tell them the surfaces involved, the weight involved, etc and they'll recommend the exact caster for your need. Very helpful chaps.
     
  10. Shortround

    Shortround TrainBoard Member

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    I would prefer a rubber type pad glued to the bottom rather than felt. If you wash the floor the felt will absorb some of the cleaner and leave marks. The rubber/vinyl wouldn't absorb it.
     
  11. tracktoo

    tracktoo TrainBoard Member

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    Plasti-dip. As thick as you want and removeable if needed.
     

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