DCC++ child-proof throttle/cab control

Old Kent Biker Aug 14, 2018

  1. Old Kent Biker

    Old Kent Biker New Member

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    Hi, just returning to railway modelling after a few decades. Looking to build a simple layout for my grandson. I'd like to use DCC++ but I'm looking for a simple cab that he can use. All it needs is a rotating knob for fwd-stop-rev, perhaps 2 or 3 function buttons for future use, and a pre-selected loco address that he doesn't have to worry about - a separate throttle for each loco (1=Thomas, 2-Edward, 3=Henry, etc) would be ideal, but possibly something like the Bachmann E-Z controller may do...

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. Keith Ledbetter

    Keith Ledbetter TrainBoard Member

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    This would be fairly easy to do honestly. My suggestion would be have a look through the threads on original throttle by David Bodnar. Along with great work bu UK Steve and others. Just through excluding or hardcoding a few lines in place of variables on the arduino program should be totally doable. I have also thought of doing this for my 5 year old son with just a few buttons. Knob for speed control, button for direction, then maybe a whistle and horn button and thats it. I would hardcode the address in but you certainly could use 3 buttons for three different addresses. If I decide to do something with this I'll post progress and would ask if you would do the same!
     
    Old Kent Biker likes this.
  3. Pieter

    Pieter TrainBoard Member

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  4. 4-4-0

    4-4-0 TrainBoard Member

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    why not use the cheap EZ-controller it works, you have nine locos, it´s easy and for the rest switch to dcc++
     
  5. mikegillow

    mikegillow TrainBoard Member

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    My recollection with the Bachmann E_Z Command controller was that, when I switched from one loco to the next, as soon as I touched the throttle knob the selected loco speed would jump to match the knob setting. It is a potentiometer, not a rotary encoder (or at least it behaves like a potentiometer). Could prove challenging for a very young/inexperienced operator.
     

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