Mystery SD&E Art Print

Hardcoaler Sep 22, 2017

  1. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    Somehow or other, this art print came into my possession 40+ years ago. It's No. 8 of 50 produced by Paul A. Hough in 1973. It's 10" x 6-5/8" and looks as if ink was applied to a carved block and pressed into onion skin paper.

    It's long mystified me what street or interurban railroad this might be. The only SD&E I can find is the San Diego and Eastern Railroad, which worked only a line survey and shut about 1905 without a rail being laid, and the snow scene is hardly reminiscent of southern California.

    Is this a fanciful print without historic merit or can someone identify what we see? Thanks!

    Digging Out On The SD&E Print - for upload.jpg
     
  2. Doorgunnerjgs

    Doorgunnerjgs TrainBoard Member

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    Maybe this?
    Found this at http://genealogytrails.com/ill/lee/gallerydixon3.html



    [​IMG]
    With the rapid success that the S.D. & E. Electric Railway was having with shuttling passengers back and forth from Dixon and Sterling, this area was frequented by many citizens of both communities for relaxation and enjoyment. In a relatively short time the management of the S.D. & E. saw this as a means to increase passengers on their Interurban cars between the two cities. With that, the electric railway company purchased the property, promptly added a rail spur into the park area and on June 8, 1906 the formal opening of the old park took place on a Friday evening. The park would now be known as Interurban Central Park and S.D. & E. manager, H.C. Higgins was in charge of its operation.

    Between seven and eight hundred citizens of Sterling, Rock Falls and Dixon were in attendance. Many had rode on the early evening rail cars in anticipation of the festivities, going out before having supper and taking with them, their meal in baskets and enjoying a picnic supper in the park. The Banda Verde, Sterling's famous concert band at the time gave an open air concert in the band
    [​IMG]
    stand for an hour which was then followed by short talks, formally dedicating the new pavilion. After that chairs were moved aside for dancing. The Academy Orchestra, also of Sterling provided the dance music until one o'clock in the morning. Special rail cars were waiting to take the happy and entertained people back to their respective communities. The park quickly gained a reputation as being the finest place in the vicinity to spend a pleasant day or evening. And the S.D. & E. used it fully in promoting its business. The fare was 15 cents from Dixon and 10 cents from Sterling. In addition local newspapers always gave good publicity to trolley parties and picnics along the line. Vaudeville entertainment was provided each night and Sunday afternoons during the summer. Ball games were played with such teams as the Dixon Browns and Morrison Professionals participating.
    From the Lee County Historical Society
    Photo contributed by Karen Holt
     
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  3. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    Thank you, thank you, thank you! You nailed it -- the Sterling, Dixon & Eastern Electric Railway it is. Out west of Chicago in the cornfields, completed 1904 and abandoned 1925. This makes a lot of sense because my Mom acquired the print while we lived in the Chicago area.

    Thanks again John!
     
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  4. Doorgunnerjgs

    Doorgunnerjgs TrainBoard Member

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    Glad I could help!
     
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  5. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    When I first saw "SD&E", I mistakenly thought of southern California. Very interesting to learn what it was and how far away in reality.
     
  6. BarstowRick

    BarstowRick TrainBoard Supporter

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    If it was Southern California, the digging out would be the result of a windstorm and drifting sand. Grin!
     
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