NYC Maxwell IN - 1900

rhensley_anderson Aug 12, 2017

  1. rhensley_anderson

    rhensley_anderson TrainBoard Supporter

    1,215
    407
    34
    This was the Springfield Division of the Big Four. Notice the water plug at each end of the wather tank. Both of the track cars are hand powered.
    Maurice Lewman Collection.

    [​IMG]
     
    BoxcabE50 and Hardcoaler like this.
  2. Hytec

    Hytec TrainBoard Supporter

    10,120
    507
    124
    This is the first time I'm aware of two water plugs. Though it's logical to quickly provide water in either direction.

    What I find surprising is that this efficiency should be found in a small town like Maxwell. In November, 1945 at El Paso, TX, I watched a Southern Pacific GS class uncouple from the Golden State and go forward a few hundred yards for water. I'm sure El Paso had a lot more traffic than Maxwell.
     
  3. fitz

    fitz Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

    8,337
    422
    104
    Thanks, Roger. Hank, well, it was the New York Central.
     
  4. Hytec

    Hytec TrainBoard Supporter

    10,120
    507
    124
    You are so right. I should have seen that. :oops:

    However, still a great photo. (y)
     
  5. Point353

    Point353 TrainBoard Member

    1,309
    226
    21
    One might imagine that the marginal cost for a second standpipe must of have been fairly small in relation to the overall cost of what appears to be a sizable water tower.
    Maxwell seems to be situated about halfway between Indianapolis and New Castle.
    What would have been the range for a steam loco, back then, before the water tank in the tender needed to be refilled?
     
  6. rhensley_anderson

    rhensley_anderson TrainBoard Supporter

    1,215
    407
    34
    While sorting through my father's estate it became obvious to me that 90 percent of the family pictures dating well back into the last century had been destroyed by sitting under water for a long period of time. This was one of them.
    Description:
    Location: East Central Indiana (near Maxwell, IN)
    Date: 1901/2
    Subject: Railroad Track Gang (CCC&StL?)
    Charles H. Hensley 4th from left (w/pick)

    [​IMG]
     
    Kurt Moose and Hardcoaler like this.
  7. Hytec

    Hytec TrainBoard Supporter

    10,120
    507
    124
    I remain in awe of what a team of Gandy Dancers could perform. Years ago there was regular feature on TV, I believe on CBS hosted by Charles Kuralt(sp?), that featured life around the US. One episode featured a team of Gandy Dancers on the Mississippi Export Railroad tamping and aligning track on a curve. What I remember most of that piece was a group of 12-15 men standing next to the track on the outside of a curve, all with long steel crowbars wedged between the outside rail and the ballast, while the leader stood 30-40 feet away next to the track where he could see the alignment. Someone, possibly the leader would start to chant a spiritual which the group joined. Then with each downbeat of the music, each member of the team would shove against their crowbar and the entire track would move 1-2 inches. This kept up for a few minutes until the leader determined the track to be aligned properly, at which point the chant would stop. It was amazing to see how far the track moved in just 4-5 minutes, but the curve was smooth.

    I have been unable to find that, or any of those episodes on the Internet, especially YouTube. Perhaps one of you would know where to find them?
     
    Kurt Moose likes this.
  8. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

    55,291
    1,526
    583
    This would be my guess about two plugs.
     
  9. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

    55,291
    1,526
    583
    I am certain I have seen it on the 'Net. Perhaps it was YouTube?
     
  10. Hytec

    Hytec TrainBoard Supporter

    10,120
    507
    124
    This video shows manual track alignment by Gandy Dancers I was referring to earlier. It was shot in 1929 as raw footage for a newsreel.

     
    Kurt Moose likes this.

Share This Page