Image stacking software

gjslsffan Sep 28, 2018

  1. gjslsffan

    gjslsffan Staff Member

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    Does image stacking software work in the camera, or does it happen after you upload images in your computer?
    I would think it has to be in the camera, but I dont know.
    Also is the Helicon good? Are there freeware versions available?
    Thanks for insights and comments.
     
  2. RBrodzinsky

    RBrodzinsky Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Image stacking is, usually, post camera. Takes a lot of processing power to perform it. Helicon is excellent, and many TB members use it. It is very easy to use.
     
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  3. MK

    MK TrainBoard Member

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    Some of the higher end cameras, e.g., Nikon D850, you can do it in the camera.
     
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  4. RBrodzinsky

    RBrodzinsky Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    True, but a $750 camera and $750 PC is a heck of a lot cheaper than a $3500 (body only) camera
     
  5. Akirasho

    Akirasho TrainBoard Member

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    Curious. Are you asking as a general photog question or do you have a project in mind? I'm having a time trying to figure out the application with trains!

    While his example is shooting the moon, Tony Northrup describes image stacking about 4:30 in.

     
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  6. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    I'm wondering the same thing Akirasho. I'd never heard of this capability prior to reading this thread. My guess is that by taking the same image at different focus points, depth of field can be improved?
     
  7. RBrodzinsky

    RBrodzinsky Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Image stacking is wonderful for model railroading, especially if you are trying for a long look down the layout. There are plenty of threads here on TB that demonstrate this. The key is it allows keeping the aperture wide open and shutter speed fast, rather than going to f22 (or such) and using long exposure. Note how this allowed me to get the foreground trees (about 6 inches from lens), and the coal in the tender and rocks on side (about 20 inches from lens) both in focus

    As an example, here is my Big Boy in a stacked photo
    Big Boy Tunnel.jpg

    Here are a few of the images used in the stack. I used 10 in all. Stacking was done with Helicon Focus.
    DSC_2233.JPG
    DSC_2236.JPG

    DSC_2237.JPG

    DSC_2239.JPG
     
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