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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Long Island, New York
    Age
    25
    Posts
    422

    HO Scale Traction Tires

    Hey all. I recieved a Long Island (old paint scheme, gray-organge) for my birthday on Sunday. My dad picked it up at a train meet we went to this weekend. The sticker price was $40, but my dad talked him down to $25. The motor seems powerful, but it slips. No traction tires. Do they sell these sepertely?
    TRAIN CRAZED JAZZ MUSICIAN

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    217
    Hey fellow Long Islander,

    I think the best thing to do is to see if there is room inside the loco to add more weights. The heavier the loco, the less wheelslip it will experience.

    Which LIRR engine is it, BTW?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    right by the kcs mainline in heavener ok
    Age
    21
    Posts
    67
    Thats what i would do.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Charleston, S.C.
    Age
    72
    Posts
    1,037
    I agree with the two previous messages.

    Know that they've improved materials and all of that, but if God had meant for locomotives (of any type) to have traction tires - He would have had Mr. Vauclain, Bellepaire, etc. do it!

    That being said, it seems to me that either/both Virnex Industries or Stewart Industries sold the tires and the tool to apply them.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Long Island, New York
    Age
    25
    Posts
    422
    Quote Originally Posted by LongIslandTom
    Hey fellow Long Islander,

    I think the best thing to do is to see if there is room inside the loco to add more weights. The heavier the loco, the less wheelslip it will experience.

    Which LIRR engine is it, BTW?
    Dang. I meant to say what engine it was. It's an RS-3.
    TRAIN CRAZED JAZZ MUSICIAN

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    217
    If it's an Atlas engine, you can probably add some more weights in the fuel tank (it's hollow I think), in the cab, and maybe glue some under the top of the hood if you can clear the lighting PCBs.

    Post some photos! :shade:

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    Laid Back Texan
    Posts
    4,834
    No tires will make different diameters on wheels so some will have to slip and cause drag.

    Fill tire grooves with metal filled epoxy and turn back smooth.
    Watash #982
    The Hurrier I go, the
    Behinder I get, but I'm
    always prompt no matter
    how long it takes!




  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Charleston, S.C.
    Age
    72
    Posts
    1,037
    Best thing is to advise who made the engine.

    If it is Atlas, Stewart, or MDC - you'd have to groove the wheels to use traction tires, not a job I'd undertake short of a fully equipped workshop and a lot of experience.

    If it is by AHM (Mekhatanica/Yugoslavia), I'd still replace the "grooved " wheels with non-grooved wheels or drivers.

    I've been slightly amazed at some of the current "good" steam engines having "traction tires" - yes I know it increases traction, but so does a well-balanced, properly weighted model.

    And that latter model is a more trouble-free model.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Northern Colorado
    Age
    69
    Posts
    464
    Blog Entries
    18

    Talking I'll take Michelins please

    I saw some traction tire bands at Don's Hobbies in Greeley Colorado a couple of weeks ago. They only had one package and they were for steam locomotives. So, someone makes them. Google and phone call time.

    I have one locomotive with traction tires and frankly wish ALL my loco's had them. They pull better, don't stall as often and pul 2.5 times the cars up 3% grades.

    For the record, some prototype trains do have rubber tires, like the ones at Denver International Airport and the Disney Lands. I'd not be surprised in another 20 years we see them on the mainlines

    If you keep your train rubber side down, you'll probably never notice the tires. :shade:

    I never noticed the tires on my P2K 0-8-0 until I was trying to figure out why it will out pull my P2K 2-8-8-2 and my BLI 4-8-4, both of which are heavier than the 0-8-0 and have 1/3 the pulling power.

    I am like the others, running with out bands could cause some harm to rails over time.

    Good luck, in any event, the current situation is not satisfactory. Find some tires and play trains. . .

    Joe Daddy
    Joe Daddy

    website Blog

    My railroad is HO and Santa Fe in the 50s
    My blog includes my 20 lessons learned as a newbie!


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    217
    Quote Originally Posted by diligentman
    For the record, some prototype trains do have rubber tires, like the ones at Denver International Airport and the Disney Lands. I'd not be surprised in another 20 years we see them on the mainlines
    Traction tires on prototypes are restricted to light passenger rail operations where the cars weigh just a few tons, and wear and tear isn't that heavy.

    You won't ever see them on heavy mainline freight trains. A heavy high-horsepower freight locomotive weighing a few hundred tons will go through rubber traction tires like Kobayashi downing hot dogs at Coney Island.

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