Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Oxford, Ohio; Decatur, Alabama
    Age
    66
    Posts
    10,998
    Blog Entries
    85

    Great Lakes Bulk Carrier Sneak Preview

    I'm working on a Great Lakes Bulk Carrier in Z scale. It's the SeaWay max 730 feet long by 75 feet beam--huge even for Z scale at about 40 inches long. The size might be apparent by the proverbial dime on the deck about amidship. Still lots of development to go, but notice that it features open holds. Of course, that means a lot of work for the coamings around the hatches.



    I need some indication of interest before I put this into production. I'm pretty sure that lack of demand for something this size will lead to it being an "on commission only" model.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fontill, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    830
    except for the bow it lookes great. Laker bows are short and quite blunt to my eye this one is too long and pointee

    3 hatch covers to a hold is what I see and is consistent with the 750 ft ships I know on the lakes
    regards Garth Hamilton, VE3HO
    http://ve3ho.ca

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Medford, Oregon
    Age
    67
    Posts
    1,352
    Pete, you are doing a fine job on that ship model. I would tend to agree with Garth on the bow being a bit pointed, but it is after all your football and you can play the game any old way you like. Just don't name her Edmund Fitzgerald.... :o)

    Not too many Z scalers will have any scenes where that would fit in, but who knows you may find a market somewhere you aren't expecting.

    Looking forward to seeing progress photos. Keep up the good work.
    Loren Snyder
    Stonebridge Models

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Oxford, Ohio; Decatur, Alabama
    Age
    66
    Posts
    10,998
    Blog Entries
    85
    I agree the bow is too pointy. I modified an existing bow, and didn't make it blunt enough. It looked great until I photographed it. That's what prototypes are for. I should probably just copy the stern.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Bloomington, IN
    Age
    47
    Posts
    182
    Referring back to the links in the other container thread, the bow may be a bit long but definitely needs to remain pointed for this style of ships. I like the looks, bow aside, and the open holds are a very nice addition that will allow an "action" seen to be created.

    Not sure of the demand will warrant production, but I will say I'm interested.

    ~Paul E.
    Modeling WI/MN rail in the 70's and beyond in Z.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Oxford, Ohio; Decatur, Alabama
    Age
    66
    Posts
    10,998
    Blog Entries
    85
    I'll break out the razor saw tomorrow, and try a new bow. That will allow the pilot house to be moved forward, leaving a bit of space for an optional self-unloader. I've read that the unloaders were often added later, as in the case of the Algomarine--and the pilot house is modeled loosely after that ship, and will be modeled more closely on the second attempt. (Why were the pilot houses so large on these ships? They are so large I'm going to have to add interior details.)

    I think 18 hatches with six holds is fairly prototypical. I've actually counted hatches on a number of 730' ships and come up with 14, 16 or 18. I think some ships had only three holds, but that might make the model hull a little flimsy (although you could probably use the first hull as a cricket bat). BTW, the distance between the outer hull and the hold walls (the inner hull in this case) is pretty small and as prototypical as I could achieve.

    I don't see much of a market on Z scale railroads. At 40" long, these might find a "tabletop display" market. Building a full hull model rather than a waterline model is just a bit more difficult. I will say that these are now approaching museum quality in fit and finish as I get better at the digital cutting technologies.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Central PA USA
    Age
    49
    Posts
    794
    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Nolan View Post
    ......
    I don't see much of a market on Z scale railroads. At 40" long, these might find a "tabletop display" market. Building a full hull model rather than a waterline model is just a bit more difficult. I will say that these are now approaching museum quality in fit and finish as I get better at the digital cutting technologies.
    That's part of the reason that I bought the drawings for the Calcite for my layout plans. At 436' long by about 60' wide, it works out to be a good size for a layout. And, with the 60' beam, it could realistically be stretched to over 600'. There were also some very compact lakers that were only about 260' long by 43' wide that were built to use the locks on the St.Lawrence river (pre-seaway). Some of these were still on the lakes into the 80s.

    Dan S.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fontill, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    830
    I would not move the pilot house, If you add self unloading it is set back into the the rear of the deck house and the day cabin for guests and the galley and dinning room are relocated within the accommodation block. The Lakers without self unloader have a day cabin for guests of the owners behind the wheel house and below that the owners and guest cabins. The wheel house is full width as entering the locks and coming alongside there is a helm position with steering levers, thruster controls and engine controls, and rudder angle indicator at each wing but no wheel, on each bridge wing. The center steering pedestal with wheel for helmsman is located in center of wheel house with autopilot and gyro compass and magnetic compass, rudder angle indicator. just forward of this is a console with radar usually 2, depth sounder, radios, log engine controls gyro repeater, large rudder angle indicator overhear visible from any position in the wheel house and steering levers non follow-up and full follow-up and is used by the officer on watch and master or captain to control the ship when there is no helmsman present. usually the masters or captains chair is here as well if fitted. Usually to the right of the helmsman's position is the navigation table. with radar repeaters,depth sounder repeaters and log, satellite radio weather fax, gyro compass repeater, radios and night curtains to block white light from affecting vision of those on duty in wheel house. There are two generic terms used to describe the lakers, flat back and self unloaders, flat backs have to be unloaded by shore side cranes, while self unloaders can discharge their cargo themselves. One of the shortest trips on the lakes for a self unloader is picking up coal from Conneaut Ohio 8 hours to load 4 hours across Lake Erie to Nanticoke Ontario Generating station to unload 8 hours and back 4 hours across the lake to conneaut Ohio to reload and they do this from April when the ice is out to Christmas when the ports ice up. Officers work month on and month off and rest of the crew 2 months on and a month off. During winter layout all major maintenance is done and there is a 2 man watch crew inboard when no work is being done. Any major break downs during the shipping season and repair crews are brought on board and the work is carried out while the ship continues to sail, unless it is main engines and the work can not be done under way, or the vessel has to go into dry dock for repairs.
    regards Garth Hamilton, VE3HO
    http://ve3ho.ca

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Oxford, Ohio; Decatur, Alabama
    Age
    66
    Posts
    10,998
    Blog Entries
    85
    A little ship surgery--almost like the real thing--grafted a more correct bow onto the laker. The old pointy bow (with the bloody nose) is in the center.



    I have to say this was a lot of fun.

    I also got the hatch coamings on, and the hatch covers assembled and painted (the covers are still in the paint shop):



    I need to smooth out the hull transitions, and figure out the poop deck structures. I gained one hatch cover with the bow transplant, right behind the pilothouse, and that one can't be opened, as it reinforces the splice. So my ship will have 19 hatches. Production ships will have 18 hatches.

    Garth, thank you so much for your information! It will help me as I transform this from a prototype into a real model.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fontill, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    830
    got to hand it to you looks perfect.
    regards Garth Hamilton, VE3HO
    http://ve3ho.ca

Similar Threads

  1. Sneak Preview: New N scale Minesweeper
    By Pete Nolan in forum N Scale
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: February 10th, 2008, 05:00 AM
  2. BLMA New Product Sneak Preview
    By Craig Martyn in forum N Scale
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: December 2nd, 2006, 02:41 AM
  3. Beavercove Sneak Preview
    By Pete Nolan in forum N Scale
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: August 5th, 2006, 06:07 PM
  4. Sneak Preview: A New N Scale Ship
    By Pete Nolan in forum N Scale
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: April 8th, 2006, 02:01 AM
  5. Kato sneak preview?
    By HemiAdda2d in forum N Scale
    Replies: 68
    Last Post: July 13th, 2005, 03:49 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •