Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Sedona, AZ
    Age
    38
    Posts
    1,519

    Walkways on trestles

    Guys, I'm starting to build my steel trestle, and was wondering if I should add a walkway down the side. Looking are prototype pics from all eras, I see some trestles have walkways and some do not. Is there some sort of regulation about having a walkway or not? Or was some rule imposed after a certain year that they all need to have one?
    I don't really want to bother with adding one, but I want it to be as close to prototype as possible.
    Thanks all

    Mike

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Age
    62
    Posts
    1,768
    I have never seen a trestle with a dedicated sidewalk or walking deck. Instead, there are safety refuges, often with a drum filled with sand for fighting fires.

    For those railroads that do have walking decks, and I have no doubt there are some, it must be a policy that drives such a construction. It may have had something to do with providing a walking path across the trestle for rail workers who needed access to both sides of the obstacle. It could be, for example, that a yard was at/near one end of the trestle, and some other facility on the other end, and employees would have found the path directly across a trestle to be handy. I'm just fishing here, obviously.
    Crandell

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Age
    51
    Posts
    1,083
    There is a steel trestle on the CNR line at Ste-Ursule, Quebec, over a valley. It's about 1300 feet long, 180 feet high, and has a walkway along one side, and at least one safe area. Considering that CNR has a strict no trespassing policy, it's definitely for the workers. I suspect that the length of the structure has something to do with it - if it's a long one, you need a place to go in case a train comes rumbling along. Other than diving off the bridge, of course. :D
    I want that one, and that one, and that one...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Northeast Wisconsin, Appleton
    Age
    64
    Posts
    606
    I have seen them on wood and steel bridges that were a good distance from a car bridge to get over the obstacle. But not if they were close to a road. They were not intended for pedestrian traffic but often did get used that way.
    Growing old is mandatory. Growing up is optional.
    Proud Viet Nam Veteran.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Sedona, AZ
    Age
    38
    Posts
    1,519
    Thanks for the responses guys After doing more looking, it seems that the larger they are, the more chance of having a walkway. Here are a few examples I've found that my trestle will end up looking like. Both have a walkway on one side. So it looks like I'm gonna have to build one in...
    http://railpictures.net/viewphoto.ph...11749&nseq=114
    http://railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=318024&nseq=77

    And Crandell, here is a modern steel trestle that has an "escape area". Didn't think these were still used. :D
    http://railpictures.net/viewphoto.ph...05353&nseq=163

    Mike

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Salem OR.
    Age
    47
    Posts
    2,171
    Blog Entries
    7
    Some have them on both sides.:tb-biggrin:
    http://www.trainboard.com/railimages...ng_SCMopac.jpg

    Most of them in this area are that way. Good to hear your working on something!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas
    Age
    69
    Posts
    13,594

    Question

    These pictures are all deck girder types. What about through truss bridges?

    Here are the walkways on BLMAs through truss bridges. These bridges are relatively long and walkways would seem to me to be a safety factor. The reason I ask is that I have a modified Kato single track truss bridge and I need to add a walkway. Maybe use some type of brass industrial walkway type?

    Here is BLMAs bridge detail from their website.
    Last edited by Flash Blackman; June 16th, 2010 at 01:15 PM.

    Kitbashers...UNITE!
    Please support Trainboard's advertisers. Order from a banner add today!
    Visit My RailImages Album

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Rives Junction, Michigan, United States
    Age
    45
    Posts
    393
    Wooden bridges would have been more likely to have the walkways, as there would have been water barrels placed at intervals on the bridge to help the train crew/line crew extinguish any fires started on or near the bridge by the cinders from the engine.

    Steel bridges would have walkways if they were long or of a construction method that required yearly inspections (cable, strung or pinned truss bridges).

    Bridges would generally not have walkways if they were short, easy to inspect from the banks, easy to access by the public or in high population area. There are several long, high bridges in the Allegehnies that I know of that lack any walkway strictly to keep the locals from even thinking about walking across them.

    In my years of photographing in and around railway property (Midwest area) the only times I have ever been given grief from rail workers has involved two subjects-being too close to moving equipment and being on or near a bridge. There seems to be a gut reaction from employees regarding strangers on their bridge.

    When I have seen photographs of railbridges that were designed with walkways, they have all been circa 1860-1920 (hmmmm-before a large increase in vehicular traffic) and they have usually been two story bridges. The pedestrian deck was usually above the rail deck on small bridges, and between the lines on two line large bridges.

    -Mark

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Northwest Montana
    Age
    63
    Posts
    44,570
    Blog Entries
    46
    It seems to have been dependent upon the company, for whatever practice they adapted. In my corner of the USA, smaller wooden trestles more often than not, were without a walkway. Trusses on one company had a walkway, a similar length for another RR a couple of miles away, none.

    I sure remember the fire barrels. Many as they rusted away from disuse.

    Boxcab E50
    **********
    Books & More For Sale: http://www.train-orders.com/RLD.html N Scale For Sale: http://www.train-orders.com/NFS.html


    Railroadiana, RR photos & more- Please visit my TRAIN ORDERS web site!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying!" "The handyman's secret weapon- Duct Tape!" (Red Green)
    - (#1,10,11,15)-
    (GEC-ES #12, 18, 25, 51, 55, 64, 67 ,68, 79, 89, 90, 93, 110, 119, 127, 132, 136, 138)
    Do you issue Model Railroad passes? Let's trade!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Age
    32
    Posts
    436
    Here are a couple images of a modern steel bridge with metal walkways built along it.
    It is used frequently by civilian foot traffic.




Similar Threads

  1. G-Scale bridges and trestles plans/templates
    By roushraven in forum G Scale and Larger
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: May 27th, 2010, 12:33 AM
  2. industrial walkways
    By Ozijohn in forum N Scale
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: November 8th, 2009, 03:30 PM
  3. Trestles and Bridges
    By JR59 in forum Z Scale
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: January 28th, 2008, 07:58 AM
  4. Wood Trestles: Who would put them on their layout?
    By sd80mac2000 in forum N Scale
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: March 29th, 2002, 12:27 PM
  5. BN BN Walkways
    By Maxwell Plant in forum Fallen Flags
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: November 11th, 2000, 03:15 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •