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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Ramona, California, United States
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    54
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    253

    Attach track to cork roadbed

    I am sure everybody has their own way of doing this, but I was wondering how do you attach your track to cork roadbed?

    Also does everybody solder their rail joiners are there other methods?
    CraigS

    You are invited to visit: css29 Gallery - RailImages.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    Livin on the Rim of the Wht Mtns, Az
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    I use a low heat hot glue. Small dab every 6 inches or so in the middle of the ties to attach track to track bed. I solder joiners every other rail on flex track. That gives me aprox 60 inches of solid rail...alternating every 30 inches or so. Hope that made sense...lol

    * I should add: The soldered joiners also have feeders attached


    .
    TrainBoard Attached Thumbnails TrainBoard Attached Thumbnails solderflextrack.jpg  
    Last edited by mtntrainman; February 28th, 2010 at 12:26 AM.
    George...Proud owner and operator of : T.H.E.R.R.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Santa Fe, New Mexico
    Age
    58
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    1,088
    Quote Originally Posted by css29 View Post
    I am sure everybody has their own way of doing this, but I was wondering how do you attach your track to cork roadbed?

    Also does everybody solder their rail joiners are there other methods?
    I use Titebond III to glue both the cork to the subroadbed and the track to the cork. It dries quickly yet the bond can be broken if you wish. I use nails when necessary to hold track exactly where I want it, both horizontally and vertically. After my ballast dries, I pull the nails. (I always use nails to make sure my turnouts are just where I want them).

    I do not solder rail joiners. What I do is run feeders. I actually worry about there not being enough free play for the rails to expand in heat without warping things. (Should my air conditioner fail!)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Montreal Canada Eh
    Age
    65
    Posts
    231
    I use
    DAPģ KWIK SEALģ Tub & Tile Adhesive Caulk

    http://www.dap.com/product_details.a...=22&SubcatID=5
    to glue both the cork to the subroadbed and the track to the cork. It takes a couple of minutes before setting so you have some time to adjust the track position.

    I solder all the rail joiners on both layouts I built so far. Now both layouts are very small ( 11" X 23" and 25" X 36" ) so I don't have any expansion problem.
    When I'll build my hollow core door layout I plan to divide the layout in 3 or 4 feet sections.
    All the rail joiners on each individual section will be soldered but I won't solder the railjoiners connecting each section and sections will have a .010 or .020 gap between them.
    Each individual section will be connected by soldered wires to some power bus.
    I'm a retired electronic technician, so I like to solder :psmile:

    Jacques

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Phoenix ,AZ
    Posts
    694
    A second vote for tub and tile caulk. Holds my roadbed down and the track to the roadbed.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
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    Northwest Montana
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    Over the years, I settled on hot glue for both cork and track. I hold things in place during gluing as needed with push pins or T pins.

    I solder joints, except switches. The switches I allow to float for expansion and ease of replacing if necessary.

    Boxcab E50
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Lilburn, GA
    Age
    48
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    I use DAP latex painters caulk to attach my track to the cork roadbed. It's easy to apply, gives good working time, and has enough grab so you don't need to use pins or spikes to hold the track down while it dries.

    As for soldering rail joiners, I don't solder mine because I don't use any! Instead, I use a method suggested by Jim Reisling on his Oakville Sub layout. I am using Micro Engineering code 55 flex track. This track is stiff and holds its shape after you bend it into a curve. To join adjacent pieces, I stagger the length of the rail ends and slip them into the adjacent piece of track. Hard to explain with words so here are a couple of photos:





    I thought this method seemed a litte "on the edge" when I first tried it, but it works like a charm and I have not had a single problem in almost a year of operation. Of course, this does require electrical feeders to every piece of track, but that is something I was going to do anyway. Jamie

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Montreal Canada Eh
    Age
    65
    Posts
    231
    Interesting way of joining flextrack Jamie.
    Did you get rid of the railjoiners only for esthetical reason ?

    Jacques

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    1,060
    Quote Originally Posted by CSXDixieLine View Post
    I use DAP latex painters caulk to attach my track to the cork roadbed.
    That's what I use as well and thanks for the joinerless pictoral!
    Karl-
    CEO of the Skally Line, an Eastern MN Shortline

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Age
    67
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    It came home to roost this weekend and I am glad that I used Elmer's white glue.

    I had to rip up a turnout and about four feet of track. because of vertical inconsistencies causing problems. It was quick and easy to get up without demolishing the cork. One soaking with water, wait an hour and the track and ballast came up handily. Then, sanding down the high spots and filling in the low ones and now I am ready to lay a new turnout and new track.
    Proud Owner and Operator of The LESSONS LEARNED LINE

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