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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by SleeperN06 View Post
    How do you figure that? I just remember that 10' is approximately 3/4", but I can only guess at what 13' is.
    You are right 10 feet is 3/4 inch.

    the math is really simple FEET*12/Ratio

    the ratio for N Scale is 1:160

    10*12/160 = 0.75

    The Track plan book 101 Track Plans for Model Railroaders gives N-Scale track centers for the following

    • Sharp 1.25 (16.7 scale feet)
    • Conventional 1.125 (15 scale feet)
    • Broad 1.0 (13.3 scale feet)
    • Straight tracks as close as 13 scale feet from center to center

    It defines minimum curve radii as

    • Sharp 9 inches
    • Conventional 12 inches
    • Broad 15 inches
    N Scale the Normal Scale© Greenbriar Delta & Rutland web site So many projects, so little time, The GD&R on TrainBoard. My other interests.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxairedale View Post
    You are right 10 feet is 3/4 inch.

    the math is really simple FEET*12/Ratio

    the ratio for N Scale is 1:160

    10*12/160 = 0.75

    The Track plan book 101 Track Plans for Model Railroaders gives N-Scale track centers for the following

    • Sharp 1.25 (16.7 scale feet)
    • Conventional 1.125 (15 scale feet)
    • Broad 1.0 (13.3 scale feet)
    • Straight tracks as close as 13 scale feet from center to center
    It defines minimum curve radii as

    • Sharp 9 inches
    • Conventional 12 inches
    • Broad 15 inches
    All right, thanks. :thumbs_up: I got to write this down in my notes. I don’t remember if I have the 101 track book or not, but it does sound familiar.
    Johnny B

    My Latest Layout Blog - "I get no respect" Rodney Dangerfield

  3. #13
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    Closer spacing reduces the impact on the scenery, (aka less real estate) also looks better (at least for period layouts up to the late 50's. I find quite alot of modelers use to much space between tracks, which take away from the realism and reduces the scenery advantages. Some folks toute that they need to get thier big fingers between cars. well mod some salad tonges with a flat surface and felt contact points, when you pick up cars you won't leave finger prints.

    Rob

  4. #14
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    I used 1-1/16 on 18-inch minimum radius curves. It's really close when two passenger trains meet, but I've never had a sideswipe. Some larger N-scale steam hangs out a bit more than the prototype, but I don't run passenger trains behind a 2-8-8-2.

    I use 1-1/16 for yards. I could go a bit tighter, but then it's nearly impossible to pick out a car with the old 0-5-0.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Nolan View Post
    I used 1-1/16 on 18-inch minimum radius curves. It's really close when two passenger trains meet, but I've never had a sideswipe. Some larger N-scale steam hangs out a bit more than the prototype, but I don't run passenger trains behind a 2-8-8-2.

    I use 1-1/16 for yards. I could go a bit tighter, but then it's nearly impossible to pick out a car with the old 0-5-0.

    I'm running diesels on a modern railroad with only one passenger train. It is mostly taking up dust on my current layout because of too many derailments. That’s one reason why I'm designing a new layout.
    I've had my eye on some Amtrak trains for a lot of years now. I have almost on more than one occasion bought a Kato Amtrak starter set and say the heck with it and just build a layout with Unitrack. I don't know if I'm ever going to be able to run an Amtrak Train on my new layout, but thats my goal.
    Johnny B

    My Latest Layout Blog - "I get no respect" Rodney Dangerfield

  6. #16
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    The Track plan book 101 Track Plans for Model Railroaders gives N-Scale track centers for the following
    Sharp 1.25 (16.7 scale feet)
    Conventional 1.125 (15 scale feet)
    Broad 1.0 (13.3 scale feet)
    Straight tracks as close as 13 scale feet from center to center
    It defines minimum curve radii as
    Sharp 9 inches
    Conventional 12 inches
    Broad 15 inches
    101 Track Plans was first published in 1956, IIRC. N didn't exist. The figures for N were added to later editions simply by halving HO figures. Those curves are supposed to correspond to HO 18", 24" and 30". In N, those should be about 9.75", 13" and 16.5". The track centers were derived from Westcott's standards of 2.5", 2.25" and 2" for HO. So you may get some sideswiping with using his spacing figures on those curves.
    Fan of late and early Conrail... also transition-era PRR, 70s Santa Fe, BN and SP, 70s-80s eastern CN, pre-merger-era UP, heavy electric operations in general, dieselized narrow gauge, modern EFVM and Brazilian railroads in general... why bother trying to list them all?

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Triplex View Post
    101 Track Plans was first published in 1956, IIRC. N didn't exist. The figures for N were added to later editions simply by halving HO figures. Those curves are supposed to correspond to HO 18", 24" and 30". In N, those should be about 9.75", 13" and 16.5". The track centers were derived from Westcott's standards of 2.5", 2.25" and 2" for HO. So you may get some sideswiping with using his spacing figures on those curves.
    Thanks for the info, I was going to stop at my one and only LHS to check it out, but I ended up working a 12 hour day.
    Do you any ideas for a good N-scale referance book?
    Johnny B

    My Latest Layout Blog - "I get no respect" Rodney Dangerfield

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by SleeperN06 View Post
    I'm sure this has been asked before and I have tryed searching with not much luck. Ok, I'm lousy at searches, but I know somebody must have a quick answer.

    I'm in the middle of designing my new layout with Atlas RTS-8 and I'm trying to remember what a good parallel spacing is for Code 55. RTS keeps defaulting to 3.6.

    I will be going to go through some portals and the last time I did this, I had to shave the inside off the portal because it was close to a bend and the ends of my passenger cars were clipping the edge of the portal. I can't get away from this problem because I can't move the bend. I do want the spacing consistent through out the layout and don't want it look weird. I also have a double crossover using #10 switches and I don't know if there will be any problems with that. 1st time using #10s.

    I think I had about 1-5/16" on my last layout. Is that too close?
    If you can decipher it, here's a link to NMRA standards. http://www.nmra.org/standards/sandrp/s-8.html

    It appears the 1-5/16 would be okay, but if two switches align with 1-1/4 spacing, I'd be awfully tempted to use that, myself.

  9. #19
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    Here are a couple of photos that may help you decide.



    1 1/4" vs 1" track center spacing.
    From my blog posting Layout Progress Report 10/16/2008

    Personally, I like 1" for the yards. 1 1/4" for the mains.
    Greg Amer
    Locomotive Engineer (EN05 564) - Stacy Yard

    THE INDUSTRIAL LEAD
    facebook.com/TheIndustrialLead


  10. #20
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    Thats exactly the center to center spacing I was working with, 1 inch, and that was for yard & main though. I am now in the process of laying track but now I am contemplating using unitrack since I got some of it. My only concern is spacing say between 2 mains on account of switches, I.E. a crossover from main to main. Also concerned as to the spacing of tracks in a yard as to the distance center to center on account of the switches involved. Unitrack #4's look like they may be around a Peco #6 and unitrack #6's look more like Peco #8's to me but I am only going off of photos and diagrams I have on Kato's unitrack I got online. If anone knows or has input please give me a shout as I am doing the big search for any and all info on unitrack.

    Dave
    COHS Member #1627
    NS Engineer

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